Spotted Wing Drosophila Update: 10/17/2014

October 17th, 2014 11:21 AM

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA UPDATE: OCTOBER 17, 2014

Click on photo to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

Male and Female Spotted Wing Drosophila Flies

Male (left) and Female (right) Spotted Wing Drosophila, photo by Griffin Dill. Actual size: 2-3 mm.

We have been anticipating a rapid increase in spotted wing drosophila trap captures since late August, based on our experience over the past two seasons, and it appears that we are now seeing it in at least some locations. The highest fly counts of the season occurred this week at sites where we have been seeing numbers rising over the past several weeks, including Wells, Cape Elizabeth, Dresden and, most notably, Warren. It should be noted, however, that the trap in Warren was placed close to a waste pile of rotten fruit where flies were abundant; although, until this week, most of the fruit flies caught at that site were species other than spotted wing drosophila. Not all trap sites have been experiencing a significant rise in fly counts, and some have remained at surprisingly low and stable levels. This is probably due to a combination of localized conditions, such as availability of food and lack of moisture, which could limit their ability to reproduce. At sites where drosophila populations are high, they will probably continue to increase until we have several hard frosts, and/or available food is depleted. Most farms have called an end to their berry season and have stopped spraying. There are still a few that are taking advantage of this warm fall and continue to harvest fall raspberries and late blueberries. These crops will need to continue to be sprayed until harvest is complete to protect against drosophila infestation.

This is our last regularly scheduled update for spotted wing drosophila for the 2014 season. We will update our website with any new information on spotted wing drosophila and management as it becomes available. I’d like to thank all of the farms that helped us with trapping this year, and express my appreciation to the people who helped maintain the traps and count all those flies, including Ben Woodman, Christina Hillier, Kara Rowley, Tammy Cushman and Pat McManus. We hope to monitor spotted wing drosophila populations around the state again next year to keep growers informed about this threat and to better understand how to manage it.

Town Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 10/17/14 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 10/10/14 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 10/3/14 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/26/14
Limington 128 127 48 6
Limerick 859 346 141 195
Wells 18,928 6,064 558 523
Cape Elizabeth 1,722 684 417 401
Bowdoinham 181 106 46 25
Dresden 6,872 3,075 739 599
Warren 50,848 620 211 128
Farmington 10 17 29 23
Livermore Falls 16 12 28 5
Mechanic Falls 70 15 33 20
Poland Spring 544 1,171 2,118 604
Monmouth 329 66 24 23
Wales 200 123 215 67
Old Town * 29 13
Levant * 43 31 30

*We’ll update the information for this site as soon as we have finished counting the trap catch.

Based on what we know so far about this pest, here again are our six rules for managing spotted wing drosophila.

  1. Monitor for the flies with traps, and for the larvae in fruit.
  2. Spray regularly and often once flies have been found in the field (1-2/week).
  3. Harvest fruit regularly and often; do not leave any ripe/rotten fruit in the field.
  4. Sort fruit at harvest; do not leave any soft fruit in the container to be sold.
  5. Chill all fruit immediately after harvest to 38ºF (or as close as you can) for at least 12 hours to slow development of any eggs or larvae.
  6. Prune the planting to open up the canopy and create dry, light conditions.

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

IPM Web Pages:
http://extension.umaine.edu/ipm/
http://www.pestwatch.psu.edu/sweet_corn.htm
http://www.umass.edu/umext/ipm/

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

 

Spotted Wing Drosophila Update: 10/10/2014

October 10th, 2014 1:06 PM

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA UPDATE: OCTOBER 10, 2014

Click on photo to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

drosophila trap

Drosophila Trap, photo by David Handley

Spotted wing drosophila trap captures have increased considerably in most locations this week, although some inland sites are not yet seeing a stable upward trend. We have been anticipating a sustained, sharp increase in fly numbers for some time, and this may be the start of it. Over the past two seasons, we have not seen drosophila numbers decline until after several hard frosts in November. As we mentioned last week, some of the trap count increases may be related to most of the fruit being gone, which makes our traps more attractive to the flies. In spite of the increased numbers of flies, however, we have not been seeing an increase in fruit infestations with larvae. In fact, it has not been easy to find infested fruit in most plantings. Growers who still have berries to harvest have been able to manage drosophila very well with a seven to ten day spray schedule, with no larvae being found in the fruit. We plan to keep monitoring spotted wing drosophila for one more week. Our final planned report will be on October 17th.

Town Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 10/10/14 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 10/3/14 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/26/14
Limington 127 48 6
Limerick 346 141 195
Wells 6064 558 523
Cape Elizabeth 684 417 401
Bowdoinham * 46 25
Dresden 3075 739 599
Warren 620 211 128
Farmington * 29 23
Livermore Falls * 28 5
Mechanic Falls 15 33 20
Poland Spring 1171 2118 604
Monmouth 66 24 23
Wales * 215 67
Old Town 29 13
Levant 43 31 30

*We’ll update the information for this site as soon as we have finished counting the trap catch.

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

IPM Web Pages:
http://extension.umaine.edu/ipm/
http://www.pestwatch.psu.edu/sweet_corn.htm
http://www.umass.edu/umext/ipm/

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Dialogue and Action

October 9th, 2014 2:32 PM

Students and faculty are taking part in a two-day conference at the University of Maine to mobilize the power of higher education to end hunger in the state.

During the Maine Hunger Dialogue on Oct. 16–17 at Wells Conference Center, participants will pack 10,000 meals to be donated to campus-based food pantries statewide.

They’ll also hear from people involved with successful programs to eradicate hunger and alleviate poverty, including Bangor native Alexander Moore, chief development officer of DC Central Kitchen and The Campus Kitchens Project.

As America’s leader in reducing hunger with recycled food, training unemployed adults for culinary careers, serving healthy school meals, and rebuilding urban food systems through social enterprise, DC Central Kitchen is at the forefront of the conversations around food waste, sustainability and workforce development.

The Campus Kitchens project takes this model to a national scale through partnerships with high schools, colleges and universities to share on-campus kitchen space, recover food from cafeterias and engage students as volunteers who prepare and deliver meals to the community.

Together, these sister nonprofits are fighting poverty through food and community empowerment. Moore, who just released his first book, “The Food Fighters: DC Central Kitchen’s First 25 Years on the Front Lines of Hunger and Poverty,” holds a master’s degree in security studies from Georgetown University.

Participants at the Maine Hunger Dialogue with their own creative ideas about ending hunger are encouraged to apply for $1,000 in startup funds to implement those plans.

Attendees will hear how a little help from friends made a significant difference in Dennis Willette’s life.

Several years ago, Willette was homeless and hungry. Then a farm manager at a local organic homestead enrolled Willette in the University of Maine Cooperative Extension’s Master Gardener Volunteers Program. “I liked being outside, but the only thing I had ever grown were tomatoes in a white bucket,” says Willette.

During the 40-hour Master Gardener Program, he fell in love with horticulture, was inspired by people he met and was motivated by the ability to help feed himself and others. He learned to can fresh vegetables and he built a root cellar.

“It was life-changing for me,” he says.

Now a Master Gardener Volunteer, Willette has a place to call home, is enrolled at York County Community College and gives back to the community.

University of Maine Cooperative Extension educator Barbara Murphy says a goal of the conference is for participants to become motivated, prepared and sufficiently connected to make a similar positive difference for some of the other estimated 200,000 Mainers, 49 million Americans and 892 million hungry people on the planet.

In 2000, UMaine Extension initiated Maine Harvest for Hunger to address food insecurity by encouraging farmers and gardeners to donate fresh fruits and vegetables to soup kitchens, food pantries and people in need.

In the last 13 Harvest for Hunger growing seasons, UMaine Extension and participating gardeners, farmers, civic organizations, schools, businesses and volunteers have donated more than 600 tons of fresh produce.

This inaugural Maine Hunger Dialogue, says Murphy, grew out of a desire to do more.

“Participants of the Hunger Dialogue will be given the rare opportunity to both learn and take action on hunger. The Maine Hunger Dialogue is featuring fascinating people who are working in innovative ways to reduce hunger both locally and globally, from putting an iron fish in cooking pots to redirecting food surplus from campus kitchens,” Murphy says.

“In addition to being inspired, attendees will be given the time and expertise needed to create hunger related projects that can be implemented on their campuses or in their communities. It promises to be an event that captures both hearts and minds.”

Sponsors are Cooperative Extension, Maine Campus Compact,Sodexo, Bangor Savings Bank, Aetna Insurance, AARP Foundation, Allagash Brewing Company, Black Bear Inn, University Inn, CignaandUMaine Auxiliary Services.

For more information, including the conference agenda, and to register, visit extension.umaine.edu/programs/hunger-dialogue.

Contact: Beth Staples, 207.581.3777

Highmoor Farm Fall Harvest Sale Oct. 9 in Orono

October 7th, 2014 1:21 PM

Staff from the University of Maine’s Highmoor Farm in Monmouth will be on the Orono campus from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 9, selling apples and pumpkins. The sale will be located by the Cyrus Pavilion Theatre between Winslow Hall and Fogler Library, weather permitting. A rain date is set for 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 16. For more information, including pricing information, visit the Highmoor Farm website or contact Greg Koller, Highmoor Farm superintendent, at 207.933.2100 or gkoller@maine.edu.

Growing Apple Trees in Maine Class – October 11, 2014

October 3rd, 2014 1:11 PM

apple, variety Zestar!Growing Apple Trees in Maine Class

THIS CLASS HAS BEEN CANCELLED

Saturday, October 11, 2014 at 11:00 AM
Longfellow’s Greenhouses
81 Puddledock Road, Manchester, Maine 04351
Venue Telephone:  207.622.5965
Registration Cost:  Free
No preregistration required.

Learn about selecting apple varieties for disease resistance and cold hardiness, types of dwarf trees, and cross pollination needs. This class will be taught by Dr. Renae Moran, Tree Fruit Specialist for the University of Maine. A selection of apple varieties will be available for sampling.

Please contact Renae Moran for more information about the class at 207.933.2100, ext. 105 or rmoran@maine.edu.

 

Spotted Wing Drosophila Update: 10/3/2014

October 3rd, 2014 10:26 AM

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA UPDATE: OCTOBER 3, 2014

Click on photos to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

Fall Raspberries

Photo by David Handley

Spotted Wing Drosophila Emerging from Fall Raspberries

Photo by James Dill

Raspberries before and after infestation, 48 hours at room temperature after picked

Spotted wing drosophila counts saw a slight upward trend again this week, but in most locations the populations appear relatively stable. This is not something we have seen in the past two seasons, when populations rose rapidly towards the end of the season, only declining after several hard frosts sometime in November. Counts have gone up markedly in a few locations; but this may be related to reduced availability of food (all the berries have been harvested), which makes our traps more attractive to the flies. More than half of the trapping sites still have very low numbers of flies compared with previous seasons. As a result, growers have been able to manage them very well with a seven to ten day spray schedule, with no larvae being found in the fruit. Growers have also been doing a very good job of keeping the plantings picked and keeping the fields free of rotting fruit, which should help slow the buildup of the flies in a field. We plan to keep monitoring spotted wing drosophila for two more weeks. Our final planned report will be on October 17th.

Town Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 10/3/14 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/26/14 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/19/14
Limington 48 6 10
Limerick 141 195 107
Wells 558 523 216
Cape Elizabeth 417 401 86
Bowdoinham 46 25 42
Dresden 739 599 275
Warren 211 128 231
Farmington 29 23 10
Livermore Falls 28 5 1
Mechanic Falls 33 20 46
Poland Spring 2118 604 365
Monmouth 24 23 28
Wales 215 67 28
Old Town 13
Levant 31 30 5

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

IPM Web Pages:
http://extension.umaine.edu/ipm/
http://www.pestwatch.psu.edu/sweet_corn.htm
http://www.umass.edu/umext/ipm/

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Spotted Wing Drosophila Update: 9/26/2014

September 26th, 2014 11:27 AM

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA UPDATE: SEPTEMBER 26, 2014

Click on photos to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

Spotted Wing Drosophila Larva in Blackberry

SWD Larvae in Blackberry, photo by David Handley

Fly captures in our traps this week are trending upward, similar to last week, including some of the highest counts of the season. However, some sites continue to have relatively low numbers, and some have lower counts than last week. There doesn’t yet seem to be a geographical pattern to where spotted wing drosophila counts are highest, i.e. north vs. south, inland vs. coastal; which was more apparent last year, with higher numbers found in southern and coastal sites. As a reference, by this time last year we were catching over 2,000 flies per week at some coastal sites. Local drosophila populations may be effected by trap location, availability of food, moisture and pesticide use. With warmer weather expected over the next few days and plenty of food still available for the flies, we may start to see the anticipated rise in numbers soon, based on what we have experienced during the past two seasons. Growers with berries remaining to harvest should continue to spray on a 5 to 7 day schedule to prevent larvae from infesting the fruit; and alternate the insecticide chemistry used, to prevent the development of resistance. Harvest the fields regularly and keep them free of overripe and rotten fruit. This practice does seem to be effective in preventing drosophila populations from building up rapidly in a field, at least when the pest pressure is moderate.

Insects in Spotted Wing Drosophila Trap

Insects in Spotted Wing Drosophila Trap, Male SWD Circled, photo by Kaytlin Woodman

Town Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/26/14 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/19/14
Limington 6 10
Limerick 195 107
Wells 523 216
Cape Elizabeth 401 86
Bowdoinham 25 42
Dresden 599 275
Warren 128 231
Farmington 23 10
Livermore Falls 5 1
Mechanic Falls 20 46
Poland Spring 604 365
Monmouth 23 28
Wales 67 28
Levant 30 5

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279


IPM Web Pages
:
http://extension.umaine.edu/ipm/
http://www.pestwatch.psu.edu/sweet_corn.htm
http://www.umass.edu/umext/ipm/

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Highmoor Farm Fall Harvest Sale – October 9, 2014

September 23rd, 2014 12:55 PM

2014 Highmoor Fall Harvest Sale at UMaine

Staff from the University of Maine’s Highmoor Farm in Monmouth will be on the Orono campus again this fall to sell high quality apples and pumpkins. We hope to see you there!

Highmoor Fall Harvest Sale
Thursday, October 9, 2014
10:00 AM to 4:00 PM
Rain Date: Thursday, October 16, 2014
10:00 AM to 4:00 PM
Located by the Cyrus Pavilion Theatre, between Winslow Hall and Fogler Library
Cash or check payments only

ApplesThe following apple varieties will be on sale, priced at $1.00 per pound:
Cortland
Empire
Gala
Golden Delicious
Macoun
McIntosh
Snow Sweet

$2.00 per pound for HoneyCrisp and organically grown HoneyCrisp

Variety of pumpkinsThere will be several varieties of pumpkins on sale.

Pumpkin prices:

$3.00 each for small
$5.00 each for medium
$8.00 each for large

 

For more information, please contact Greg Koller, Highmoor Farm Superintendent, at 933.2100 or gkoller@maine.edu.

Spotted Wing Drosophila Update: 9/19/2014

September 19th, 2014 10:59 AM

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA UPDATE: SEPTEMBER 19, 2014

Click on photos to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

Spotted Wing Drosophila on Raspberry

SWD on Raspberry, photo by David Handley.

Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) fly numbers are generally trending upward this week, although a few sites caught fewer flies than last week. We have not yet seen an exponential rise in SWD numbers that we saw late in the past two seasons, but the numbers are high enough to threaten any late ripening fruit, especially fall raspberries. Growers who have berries to harvest in the coming days and weeks should continue to spray on a 5 to 7 day interval to prevent larvae from infesting the fruit. Although we have had a few cold nights and even frost in some locations, past experience has shown that this will not seriously hinder drosophila activity in berry fields. Continue to harvest the fields regularly and keep them free of overripe and rotten fruit. Once harvest is complete, spraying should be discontinued. It does not appear that continuing sprays after harvest will significantly impact next year’s population levels.

Spotted Wing Drosophila Maggot in Raspberry

SWD Maggot in Raspberry, photo by David Handley

Town Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/19/14 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/12/14
Limington 10 54
Limerick 107 54
Wells 216 33
Cape Elizabeth 86 31
Bowdoinham 42 76
Dresden 275 93
Warren 231 49
Farmington 10 45
Livermore Falls 1 37
Mechanic Falls 46 28
Poland Spring 365 91
Monmouth 28 26
Wales 28 123
Old Town 7 9
Levant 5 6

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259         Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                          1.800.287.0279

IPM Web Pages:
http://extension.umaine.edu/ipm/
http://www.pestwatch.psu.edu/sweet_corn.htm
http://www.umass.edu/umext/ipm/

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Spotted Wing Drosophila Update: 9/15/2014

September 17th, 2014 9:37 AM

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA UPDATE: SEPTEMBER 15, 2014

Click on photos to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

Male and Female Spotted Wing Drosophila Flies

Male (left) and Female (right) Spotted Wing Drosophila, photo by Griffin Dill. Actual size: 2-3 mm.

We now have found spotted wing drosophila (SWD) flies in all of the locations we are monitoring, and numbers have been rising in most of those sites over the past week. We consider any trap counts higher than 3 flies in a week to present a significant threat to a field of ripe or ripening fruit. We will update the trap data again late this week as we catch up on the sites we weren’t able to count last week. With SWD numbers rising, growers who have berries to harvest in the coming days and weeks should plan on spraying on a 5 to 7 day interval to prevent larvae from infesting the fruit. It is now fairly easy to find infested fruit in any plots that have not been sprayed. Harvest the fields regularly and keep them free of overripe and rotten fruit to hinder the establishment of the flies. Alternate the available spray products used on your crop, such as Mustang Max®, Assail® and Delegate®, to prevent the development of insecticide resistance.

drosophila trap

Drosophila Trap, photo by David Handley

Town Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/12/14
Limington 54
Limerick 54
Wells 33
Cape Elizabeth 31
Bowdoinham 76
Dresden 93
Warren 49
Farmington 45
Livermore Falls 37
Mechanic Falls 28
Poland Spring 91
Monmouth 26
Wales 123
Old Town 7
Levant 8

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

IPM Web Pages:
http://extension.umaine.edu/ipm/
http://www.pestwatch.psu.edu/sweet_corn.htm
http://www.umass.edu/umext/ipm/

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.