Spotted Wing Drosophila Update: 9/19/2014

September 19th, 2014 10:59 AM

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA UPDATE: SEPTEMBER 19, 2014

Click on photos to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

Spotted Wing Drosophila on Raspberry

SWD on Raspberry, photo by David Handley.

Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) fly numbers are generally trending upward this week, although a few sites caught fewer flies than last week. We have not yet seen an exponential rise in SWD numbers that we saw late in the past two seasons, but the numbers are high enough to threaten any late ripening fruit, especially fall raspberries. Growers who have berries to harvest in the coming days and weeks should continue to spray on a 5 to 7 day interval to prevent larvae from infesting the fruit. Although we have had a few cold nights and even frost in some locations, past experience has shown that this will not seriously hinder drosophila activity in berry fields. Continue to harvest the fields regularly and keep them free of overripe and rotten fruit. Once harvest is complete, spraying should be discontinued. It does not appear that continuing sprays after harvest will significantly impact next year’s population levels.

Spotted Wing Drosophila Maggot in Raspberry

SWD Maggot in Raspberry, photo by David Handley

Town Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/19/14 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/12/14
Limington 10 54
Limerick 107 54
Wells 216 33
Cape Elizabeth 86 31
Bowdoinham 42 76
Dresden 275 93
Warren 231 49
Farmington 10 45
Livermore Falls 1 37
Mechanic Falls 46 28
Poland Spring 365 91
Monmouth 28 26
Wales 28 123
Old Town 7 9
Levant 5 6

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259         Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                          1.800.287.0279

IPM Web Pages:
http://extension.umaine.edu/ipm/
http://www.pestwatch.psu.edu/sweet_corn.htm
http://www.umass.edu/umext/ipm/

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Spotted Wing Drosophila Update: 9/15/2014

September 17th, 2014 9:37 AM

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA UPDATE: SEPTEMBER 15, 2014

Click on photos to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

Male and Female Spotted Wing Drosophila Flies

Male (left) and Female (right) Spotted Wing Drosophila, photo by Griffin Dill. Actual size: 2-3 mm.

We now have found spotted wing drosophila (SWD) flies in all of the locations we are monitoring, and numbers have been rising in most of those sites over the past week. We consider any trap counts higher than 3 flies in a week to present a significant threat to a field of ripe or ripening fruit. We will update the trap data again late this week as we catch up on the sites we weren’t able to count last week. With SWD numbers rising, growers who have berries to harvest in the coming days and weeks should plan on spraying on a 5 to 7 day interval to prevent larvae from infesting the fruit. It is now fairly easy to find infested fruit in any plots that have not been sprayed. Harvest the fields regularly and keep them free of overripe and rotten fruit to hinder the establishment of the flies. Alternate the available spray products used on your crop, such as Mustang Max®, Assail® and Delegate®, to prevent the development of insecticide resistance.

drosophila trap

Drosophila Trap, photo by David Handley

Town Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/12/14
Limington 54
Limerick 54
Wells 33
Cape Elizabeth 31
Bowdoinham 76
Dresden 93
Warren 49
Farmington 45
Livermore Falls 37
Mechanic Falls 28
Poland Spring 91
Monmouth 26
Wales 123
Old Town 7
Levant 8

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

IPM Web Pages:
http://extension.umaine.edu/ipm/
http://www.pestwatch.psu.edu/sweet_corn.htm
http://www.umass.edu/umext/ipm/

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Moran Talks Apples on MPBN’s ‘Maine Calling’

September 16th, 2014 12:44 PM

Renae Moran, a tree fruit specialist with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, was a recent guest on the Maine Public Broadcasting Network’s “Maine Calling” radio show. The show, titled “Apples, apples and more apples,” included discussion about favorite apple types and recipes.

Spotted Wing Drosophila Update: 9/5/2014

September 11th, 2014 1:38 PM

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA UPDATE: SEPTEMBER 5, 2014

Click on photo to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

We were not able to get to all of our spotted wing drosophila (SWD) trapping sites this week, due to our student helpers heading back to school and the holiday. We have also had to cut back on the number of monitoring sites we will continue to maintain for the remainder of the season. I would like to thank our team of IPM scouts who helped with the monitoring this summer, including Ben Woodman, Christina Hillier, Kara Rowley, Tammy Cushman, Griffin Dill and Sean McAuley.

We are now finding spotted wing drosophila flies in nearly all locations we are monitoring and numbers are rising, although not nearly as rapidly as we have experienced in the past. We will update the trap data early next week as we catch up on the sites we haven’t been able to count yet. We have included last week’s data as a reference. Growers that plan to continue harvesting over the next few weeks have been spraying for SWD on 5 to 7 intervals and are reporting good results, with no larvae being found in fruit. Most are alternating spray products such as Mustang Max®, Assail® and Delegate®.

Spotted Wing Drosophila Emerging from Fall Raspberries

SWD Emerging from Raspberries, photo by James Dill

Town Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/5/14 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 8/29/14
Springvale 0
Limington 3 11
Limerick 12 0
Wells 3
Cape Elizabeth 31 4
Buxton 1
Gray 57
Bowdoinham 163
Dresden 20
Warren 0
Oxford 0
Farmington 8
Livermore Falls 1
Mechanic Falls 17 0
Poland Spring 47 10
Turner 20
Monmouth 10 13
Wales 250
Fayette 0
Burnham 3
Thorndike 6

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

IPM Web Pages:
http://extension.umaine.edu/ipm/
http://www.pestwatch.psu.edu/sweet_corn.htm
http://www.umass.edu/umext/ipm/

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

 

 

Moran Quoted in Press Herald Article on Maine Peaches

September 8th, 2014 1:34 PM

Renae Moran, a tree fruit specialist with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, was quoted in a the Portland Press Herald article, “Maine peaches may be tricky to grow, but they’re easy to eat.” Moran said Maine gardeners can have a peach tree in their backyard without using conventional farming practices, such as spraying pesticides or integrated pest management techniques, but added, it’s “nearly impossible to produce a commercial peach crop in Maine without them.”

Sweet Corn IPM Newsletter No. 11 – September 5, 2014

September 5th, 2014 2:37 PM

Sweet CornSweet Corn IPM Newsletter No. 11 – September 5, 2014

Click on photos to enlarge.

LAST ISSUE FOR 2014!

LATE SILKING CORN REQUIRES PROTECTION

Corn Earworm, Fall Armyworm and European Corn Borer Remain Active

This will be the final issue of the Sweet Corn IPM Newsletter for the 2014 season. I would like to thank all of the growers who participated in the program this year, and our team of IPM scouts including Kara Rowley, Tammy Cushman, Ben Woodman, Griffin Dill and Sean McAuley, with help from Hayden Koller. Do you have questions, comments or suggestions about the program? Please call or e-mail us.

SITUATION
Warm weather has helped move late-planted corn along, resulting in a good supply of late season corn this week. But pest pressure has remained moderate for this time of the season. Although we won’t be monitoring moths further this season, bear in mind that moth activity will be increased on warm nights and following any tropical storm fronts that may move through Maine in the coming weeks.

European corn borer: While some sites have clearly seen a second generation of corn borer emerge over the past few weeks, other sites continue to see little, if any, pressure. Where moths are present, European corn borer will threaten any fresh silking corn remaining in fields that are not on a spray schedule for corn earworm. Cape Elizabeth, Lewiston, New Gloucester, North Berwick, Nobleboro, Palmyra, Sabattus and Wales were over the threshold of 5 moths per week in silking corn. The New Gloucester, Nobleboro, Palmyra and Sabattus sites were not on spray regimes for corn earworm, so silk sprays were recommended.

European Corn Borer on Ear of Corn

European Corn Borer on Ear, photo by David Handley

Corn Earworm Larvae

Corn Earworm Larvae, photo by David Handley

Corn earworm: Corn earworm moth counts were higher in some locations this week, as warm nights have increased their activity. A 4-day spray interval was recommended for corn earworm on silking fields in Bowdoinham, Cape Elizabeth and Lewiston. A 5-day spray interval was recommended in Biddeford and North Berwick. A 6-day spray interval was recommended in Corinth, Levant, Poland Spring, Wales, Warren and Wayne.

Fall armyworm: Moth captures continue to be erratic and not geographically aligned with corn earworm. Some sites are catching no moths while others have had very high counts. Fields in Biddeford, Bowdoinham, Cape Elizabeth, Monmouth, New Gloucester, Nobleboro, Wales, Wayne and Wells exceeded the threshold of 3 moths per week in silking corn. The Monmouth, New Gloucester, Nobleboro and Wells sites were not already on a spray regime for corn earworm, so a spray was recommended.

Unplowed Corn Field

Unplowed Corn Field, photo by David Handley

It’s time for cover crops!
Plowing down corn stalks destroys the over wintering site of European corn borer, but late plowing can leave soil prone to erosion during the winter and spring. Planting winter rye is a good option for many fields. It can be planted well into September to produce enough of a cover to prevent erosion. Rye will survive the winter and put on more growth in the spring. Rye should be killed by plowing, mowing or using an herbicide before it goes to seed. Having rye on the field may delay planting in the spring, as you must wait for conditions to be warm and dry enough to plow it in. Animal manures can also be applied to soils in early fall and incorporated to improve soil structure and provide nutrients. Cover crops should be seeded after manure applications to absorb and hold nutrients, which will be released after the crop is plowed down the following spring.

Sincerely,

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

Sweet Corn IPM Weekly Scouting Summary

Location CEW
Moths
ECB
Moths
FAW
Moths
Recommendations / Comments
Biddeford 7 0 6 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Bowdoinham 8 0 7 4-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Cape Elizabeth 33 9 44 4-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Charleston 1 1 0 No spray recommended
Corinth 2 0 0 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Dayton 1 1 1 No spray recommended
Levant 3 0 0 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Lewiston 9 8 2 4-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Monmouth 0 0 14 One spray recommended for FAW on silking corn
New Gloucester 0 21 23 One spray recommended for ECB+FAW on silking corn
Nobleboro 0 90 9 One spray recommended for ECB+FAW on silking corn
North Berwick 4 35 0 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Oxford 1 4 0 No spray recommended
Palmyra 0 5 0 One spray recommended for ECB on silking corn
Poland Spring 2 0 0 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Sabattus 0 6 0 One spray recommended for ECB on silking corn
Wales 3 14 3 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Warren 2 3 1 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Wayne 2 0 4 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Wells I 0 0 4 One spray recommended for FAW on silking corn
Wells II 1 0 3 One spray recommended for FAW on silking corn

CEW: Corn earworm (Only fresh silking corn should be sprayed for this insect.)
ECB: European corn borer
FAW: Fall armyworm

Corn Earworm Spray Thresholds for Pheromone Traps

Moths caught per week Moths caught per night Spray interval
0.0 to 1.4 0.0 to 0.2 No spray
1.5 to 3.5 0.3 to 0.5 Spray every 6 days
3.6 to 7.0 0.6 to 1.0 Spray every 5 days
7.1 to 91 1.1 to 13.0 Spray every 4 days
More than 91 More than 13 Spray every 3 days

Thresholds apply only to corn with exposed fresh silk. Lengthen spray intervals by one day if maximum daily temperature is less than 80°F.

European Corn Borer Thresholds
Whorl stage: 30% or more of plants scouted show injury.
Pre-tassel-silk: 15% or more of plants scouted show injury.
Silk: 5 or more moths caught in pheromone traps in one week.

IPM Web Pages:
http://extension.umaine.edu/ipm/
http://www.pestwatch.psu.edu/sweet_corn.htm
http://www.umass.edu/umext/ipm/

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

 

Yarborough Mentioned in Press Herald Article on Blueberry Branding

September 2nd, 2014 2:02 PM

David Yarborough, a blueberry specialist with the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, was mentioned in a Portland Press Herald article about a three-day Blog the Barrens junket for social media users in an effort to promote wild blueberries. The event was sponsored by the Wild Blueberry Association of North America and included a tour of the Wyman processing plants, a visit to Cherryfield Foods’ barrens and a lesson in raking at Merrill Blueberry Farms. In an attempt to raise awareness about the berry, Yarborough was on hand to offer information, such as the fact that 3 million varieties of wild blueberries grow in Maine.

Spotted Wing Drosophila Update: 8/29/2014

August 29th, 2014 2:53 PM

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA UPDATE: AUGUST 29, 2014

Click on photo to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) captures continue to rise in most of our trapping locations this week, leading to some of the highest numbers we’ve seen this year. The highest SWD captures occurred in Wales and Bowdoinham where, for the first time this season, we have caught over 100 SWD in a week. Gray, Dresden, Turner, Limington, Monmouth and Poland Spring also had fairly high counts (more than 10). Based on what we know about this insect so far, if more than 3 flies are caught in a single week, or more than one fly is caught over two or more consecutive weeks, a regular spray schedule (about every 7 days) is recommended to protect any ripening fruit in that location. If SWD captures continue to increase or any larvae are found in fruit, a 5-day spray schedule would be recommended. We have started finding raspberry fruit infested with SWD larvae in some fields where overripe fruit was prevalent or the planting had not yet been sprayed.

Insects in Spotted Wing Drosophila Trap

Insects in Spotted Wing Drosophila Trap, Male SWD Circled, photo by Kaytlin Woodman

Town Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 8/29/14
Springvale 0
Limington 11
Limerick 0
Wells 3
Cape Elizabeth 4
Buxton 1
Gray 57
Bowdoinham 163
Dresden 20
Warren 0
Oxford 0
Farmington 8
Livermore Falls 1
Mechanic Falls 0
Poland Spring 10
Turner 20
Monmouth 13
Wales 250
Fayette 0
Burnham 3
Thorndike 6

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

IPM Web Pages:
http://extension.umaine.edu/ipm/
http://www.pestwatch.psu.edu/sweet_corn.htm
http://www.umass.edu/umext/ipm/

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Sweet Corn IPM Newsletter No. 10 – August 29, 2014

August 29th, 2014 11:47 AM

Sweet CornSweet Corn IPM Newsletter No. 10 – August 29, 2014

Click on photos to enlarge.

PEST PRESSURE MODERATE IN MOST LOCATIONS

Highest Threat Remains in Most Southern and Coastal Regions

SITUATION
A brief warm spell pushed late season corn development this week, but more cool weather on the way should slow growth and pest pressure over the next few days. Crop quality continues to be very good, and insect pressure continues to be fairly moderate as we begin to wrap up another corn season. Next week’s newsletter will be the last issue planned for this season.

European Corn Borer Larva on Ear

European Corn Borer Larva on Ear, photo by David Handley

European corn borer: Most trapping sites caught corn borer moths this week, but numbers vary greatly by location. These moths will continue to threaten any fresh silking corn remaining in fields that are not on a spray schedule for corn earworm. Farmington, New Gloucester, Nobleboro, Oxford, Poland Spring, Sabattus, Wales and Warren were over the threshold of 5 moths per week in silking corn. The New Gloucester, Oxford, Poland Spring and Sabattus sites were not on spray regimes for corn earworm, so silk sprays were recommended. European corn borer feeding damage in pre-tassel corn was not over the 15% threshold in the few locations with young corn remaining.

Corn earworm: Corn earworm moth counts were lower in most sites this week. Cool evening weather will probably keep activity low over the next few days. A 4-day spray interval was recommended for corn earworm on silking fields in Cape Elizabeth and one Lewiston site. A 5-day spray interval was recommended in Levant, Wales, Warren and one Dayton site. A 6-day spray interval was recommended in Charleston, Nobleboro and Palmyra.

Fall armyworm: Moth captures were erratic this week; with many sites catching no moths while others had very high counts. Feeding damage from larvae was also not as prevalent this week, although there are only a few fields left that are not yet in silk. Fields in Cape Elizabeth, Dayton, Monmouth, New Gloucester, Nobleboro, and Wales exceeded the threshold of 3 moths per week in silking corn. However, only the Monmouth and New Gloucester sites were not on a spray regime for corn earworm. Fall armyworm feeding damage did not exceed the 15% threshold in any of the sites with pre-silking corn remaining.

Rust on Corn

Rust on Corn, photo by David Handley

Corn Rust: We found several fields showing symptoms of corn rust this week. This fungus disease causes reddish-brown pustules to form on the leaves, stalks and husks. When the spores get spread over the husks, it can diminish the visual quality of the ears. A fungicide spray for rust is only recommended when infection occurs prior to tassel. Later infections are unlikely to cause enough damage to justify control measures.

When Should You Stop Spraying?
When a silking cornfield is under a recommended spray interval for corn earworm, spraying may be stopped once the silks have become thoroughly dried and brown. However, if earworm pressure is very high (e.g. 91+ moths/week) and/or fall armyworm moths are over threshold (3+ moths per week), then spraying should continue until either the moth counts drop, or you reach the required days before harvest (dh) for the product being used.

Sincerely,

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

Sweet Corn IPM Weekly Scouting Summary

Location CEW
Moths
ECB
Moths
FAW
Moths
%Feeding
Damage
Recommendations / Comments
Bowdoinham 1 0 1 13% No spray recommended
Cape Elizabeth I 21 0 0 1 4-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Cape Elizabeth II 70 2 30 4-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Charleston 3 1 0 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Corinth 2 0 0 0% 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Dayton 4 2 3 2% 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Farmington 0 9 0 One spray recommended for ECB on silking corn
Levant 7 1 0 0% 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Lewiston I 1 1 0 8% No spray recommended
Lewiston II 13 0 0 4-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Monmouth 0 2 12 One spray recommended for FAW on silking corn
New Gloucester 1 5 21 12% One spray recommended for ECB+FAW on silking corn
Nobleboro 3 11 4 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Oxford 0 6 0 One spray recommended for ECB on silking corn
Palmyra 3 3 0 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Poland Spring 1 8 0 One spray recommended for ECB on silking corn
Sabattus 0 28 0 One spray recommended for ECB on silking corn
Wales 6 5 4 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Warren 7 13 2 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Wayne 0 0 1 6% No spray recommended
Wells I 0 0 0 1% No spray recommended
Wells II 1 1 2 0% No spray recommended

CEW: Corn earworm (Only fresh silking corn should be sprayed for this insect.)
ECB: European corn borer
FAW: Fall armyworm

Corn Earworm Spray Thresholds for Pheromone Traps

Moths caught per week Moths caught per night Spray interval
0.0 to 1.4 0.0 to 0.2 No spray
1.5 to 3.5 0.3 to 0.5 Spray every 6 days
3.6 to 7.0 0.6 to 1.0 Spray every 5 days
7.1 to 91 1.1 to 13.0 Spray every 4 days
More than 91 More than 13 Spray every 3 days

Thresholds apply only to corn with exposed fresh silk. Lengthen spray intervals by one day if maximum daily temperature is less than 80°F.

European Corn Borer Thresholds
Whorl stage: 30% or more of plants scouted show injury.
Pre-tassel-silk: 15% or more of plants scouted show injury.
Silk: 5 or more moths caught in pheromone traps in one week.

IPM Web Pages:
http://extension.umaine.edu/ipm/
http://www.pestwatch.psu.edu/sweet_corn.htm
http://www.umass.edu/umext/ipm/

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Growing Fruit Trees in Maine Class – October 23, 2104

August 29th, 2014 9:40 AM

Growing Fruit Trees in Maine Class

ApplesThursday, October 23, 2014
6:00 PM to 8:30 PM
Gardiner Area High School, Room 123
40 West Hill Road, Gardiner, Maine 04345
Registration Fee: $10.00 for adults. Children may attend free of charge.
Preregistration is required through MSAD #11 Adult Education.
Course ID: 6200.09.0.21.215.51.113457

Register online or contact Diann Bailey at dbailey@msad11.org or 207.582.3774 to preregister.

Come and sample a variety of apples in this class that covers the cultural requirements of fruit trees with a focus on apples, plums and peaches. Learn about grafting, types of dwarf trees, cross pollination needs, and the basics of pruning. The class will be taught by Renae Moran, Tree Fruit Specialist for the University of Maine. It will be held at Gardiner Area High School. The registration fee is $10.00 for adults and children may attend free of charge.

Please contact Renae Moran for more information about the class at 207.933.2100, ext. 105 or rmoran@maine.edu.