4th Annual Northern Maine Rural Living Day

3 chickens and a toddlerSaturday, September 8, 2018
9:00 AM – 3:00 PM
Houlton Civic Center & Fairgrounds, Houlton, Maine

If you are a small acreage/rural property owner or considering a move to the country you won’t want to miss this event. Workshops throughout the day offers something for every one, with 12 classes to choose from and an opportunity to speak with experts from over 10 local agencies and non-profits.

Pre-registration fee is $10 per person and $15 day of event.

Fee for the entire day of classes will be $10 per person.  $15 day of the event. $20 for families with 2 or more children over age 10  and children under age 10 are free. Prices do not include lunch.  A locally grown harvest lunch will be available for $10.

  • Informative classes
  • Hands on youth activities
  • Livestock displays
  • Herding dog demonstrations
  • Skilled craft demonstrations
  • Locally grown Harvest Lunch

Preregistration for classes is highly recommended to insure availability!

Register Online!

Directions

Community Room, Main Floor 2nd Floor, Classroom #1 2nd Floor, Classroom #2 Concession Lobby, Main Floor

Workshops

9:00-10:30 Backyard Maple Syrup: Filtering for Quality
Kevin & Kristi Brannen,
Spring Break Maple & Honey
Organic and Conventional Apple Tree Pruning and Management *
Randy Martin (King’s Gardener) and John Hoffses,
(SAD #1 School Farm)
Welcome the Native Bees! *
Jennifer Lund,
Maine Dept. of Agriculture, Conservation & Forestry
11:00-12:30 Home Brewing 101
Josh Parda,
Central Street Farmhouse
Growing Cranberries: The glass may be half empty … but it’s half full of cranberries! *
Charles Armstrong,
UMaine Extension

Ruminant Nutrition and Health
Dr. Colt Knight,
UMaine Extension


Planning Ahead: Choosing Fall Perennials and Preparing Your Garden for Winter
Donna Keegan,
Myrtle Tree Perennials
LUNCH
12:30-1:30
Locally Grown Harvest Lunch available for purchase
1:30-3:00 How to Create a Root Cellar
Jason Lilley,
UMaine Extension
Growing Blueberries and Raspberries *
David Handley,
UMaine Extension

Keys to Marketing Your Small Business 
Karin Petrin,
Micro-enterprise Specialist,
New Ventures Maine
Invasive Forest Pests: What Can We Do? *
Jocelyn Lahey,
District Manager,
Androscoggin Soil & Water Conservation District

* = Pesticide Credit Available.

All Day: Ongoing demonstrations by rural crafters / livestock displays in fair barns.

10:00-11:00 AM: Making Refrigerator Pickles, Youth Activity

10:30-11:00 AM: Herding Dog Demonstration, Center arena, main floor

11:00 AM-12:30 PM: Berries to Bread: Grind local wheat berries into flour, roll out the dough and have it cooked for you;
Butter Makin’ Shakin’:  Make your own butter from fresh local cream to eat on your bread!

11:00 AM-12:30 PM: Shearing and Plucking Fiber Rabbits, Civic Center, main floor

12:30-1:30 PM: Locally Grown Harvest Lunch available for purchase, Civic Center Main Floor

1:00-1:30 PM: Herding Dog Demonstration, Center arena, main floor

1:30-2:30 PM: Pasta from Scratch, Youth Activity

2:15-2:45 PM: ID Tattooing Goats, Center arena, main floor

10:00 – 3:00 PM: Youth Activities, Youth Area, main floor:

  • Making Grape Vine & Flower Crowns
  • Veggie Art Painting, Make a Helicopter
  • Pumpkin Math
  • Exciting 4-H STEM Games
  • and many MORE!

Class Details

Backyard Maple Syrup: Filtering for Quality
Kevin & Kristi Brannen, Spring Break Maple & Honey
Maple syruping is a fun hobby that the entire family can participate in and can be produced in your own backyard with very little equipment.

After collecting the sap and boiling it down to your final maple syrup, don’t miss the critical step of filtering the syrup before it is bottled.  In sap there are naturally occurring minerals commonly known as sugar sand that will harden as the syrup cools and will settle out in the bottle as the syrup cools down. Filtering maple syrup improves the taste, clarity and color of your final product. Kevin and Kristi will share their extensive knowledge as they take you through the process and learn how easy filtering maple syrup can be.

Welcome the Native Bees!
Jennifer Lund State Apiculturist, Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation & Forestry
Jenn will provide an introduction to the native bee species of Maine and how and why we should support them in our yards and gardens. This will include highlighting some of their biology, why we should not be afraid of them stinging, and what plants are great selections to include in your plantings.
1 Pesticide Credit available

How to Create a Root Cellar
Jason Lilley, UMaine Extension
We all love eating fresh produce right out of the garden during the summer months. Why not extend that feeling throughout the winter? In this session we will discuss variety selection of storage crops, harvest methods, and proper storage conditions for storing crops throughout the winter. We will also look at different methods for turning your basement, closet, or attic into an effective root cellar.

Growing Cranberries: The glass may be half empty, but it’s half full… of cranberries!
Charlie Armstrong , UMaine Extension
Find out how cranberries grow, and what you need to know to have your own cranberry garden, or even something larger.  What are the challenges? What are the rewards?  Come and have all of your cranberry questions answered.

Charlie Armstrong is an entomologist who has been UMaine Extension’s cranberry guru for the past twenty years, assisting growers through good times and bad.  Integrated Pest Management (IPM) is his primary focus.
1 Pesticide Credit available

Keys to Marketing Your Small Business
Karin Petrin, New Ventures Maine
Are you growing more than you can use or give away? Have you thought about turning your hobby into a small business? Learn the facets about marketing your business online and how to measure how well it’s working.

In this workshop, Karin will share her expertise in micro-enterprise development to help you figure out where to start and talk about setting up a website and using social media for promoting and analytics.

Growing Raspberries and Blueberries
David Handley, UMaine Extension
Raspberries and blueberries are two of our most popular fruits in Maine and they are not difficult to grow. Learn how to select plants for our climate and maintain these delicious summer fruits as part of your garden/yard landscape.
1 Pesticide Credit available

Home Brewing 101
Josh Parda, Central Street Farmhouse, Bangor
Ever find yourself wondering, “How in the heck do I make good beer?” Well have no fear, the Farmhouse team is here! Allow us to demystify the beer brewing process so that you can make the best beer of your life in the comforts of your own kitchen, garage, porch, or backyard. Even if you’ve already brewed a batch or two, this informative workshop can help your process. Plus, it smells good.

Invasive Forest Pests: What Can We Do?
Jocelyn Lahey, District Manager, Androscoggin Soil & Water Conservation District
The focus of the invasive forest pest program is to help participants identify current and potential invasive forest pests and their host tree species, to inform attendees about the threats these pests pose, and to teach how to report suspected pest sightings and damage.
1 Pesticide Credit available

Ruminant Nutrition and Health
Dr. Colt Knight, Assistant Professor of Extension, State Livestock Specialist, UMaine Extension
Dr. Knight will discuss basic anatomy and physiology of ruminant animals and how/why ruminant animals digest forage and utilize cellulose. Also covered will be basic nutrient requirements of ruminants, and how that changes over their lifetime.

Planning Ahead: Choosing Fall Perennials and Preparing Your Garden for Winter
Donna Keegan Myrtle Tree Farm
Perennial plants are the backbone of nearly every flower garden. Unlike annuals, which must be replanted each spring, herbaceous perennials die to the ground at the end of the season, and then regrow from the same roots the following year. Perennials are popular because they are easy to care for, dependable performers year after year, and because they offer an enormous variety of color, texture and form.

Join Donna as she shares her wisdom and knowledge about varieties that fare best in northern Maine and how to insure that your perennials are properly put to bed in anticipation of a robust revival in the spring!

Donna has run a family owned and operated perennial nursery, serving northern Maine gardeners since 1992, and has extensive experience in gardening and landscaping.

Organic and Conventional Apple Tree Pruning and Management
Randy Martin, The King’s Gardener, and John Hoffses, Director, SAD #1 School Farm   
1 Pesticide Credit available
Whether you are a backyard grower or thinking about larger orchards, plan to attend this session to learn about managing your apples.  Fertilization, pest management, planting, pruning, and other topics will be discussed.  Join Randy and John, who will present their experience and professional advice on producing apples.


For more information or if you need a reasonable accommodation, please contact Linda Trickey at 207.532.6548 or 800.287.1469 (in Maine) or linda.trickey@maine.edu by September 1, 2018. If requests are received after this date, we may not have sufficient time to make necessary arrangements.