Posts Tagged ‘spotted wing drosophila’

Spotted Wing Drosophila Alert: August 3, 2017

Friday, August 4th, 2017
Spotted Wing Drosophila Trap Catch

Spotted Wing Drosophila Trap Catch, photo by Christina Hillier

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA UPDATE: AUGUST 3, 2017

Click on photos to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

Spotted wing drosophila activity continues to increase at most trapping sites this week. (See table below.) Most of the trap counts are above what we consider potentially damaging to ripening berry crops, especially raspberries, blackberries and blueberries. Research suggests that when 6 to 10 flies are caught in a yeast-baited trap in a week, larvae will start appearing in the fruit. At this point, a spray schedule of 7 to 10 days apart should be adequate to prevent fruit infestation at most locations. However, at sites where higher populations are now occurring (New Gloucester, Farmington, Limerick, Bowdoinham), fruit may need to be under a five to seven-day spray interval to achieve adequate protection.

Spotted Wing Drosophila on Raspberry

SWD on Raspberry, photo by David Handley.

Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) populations are likely to continue rising in the coming weeks. Look for fruit flies hovering around fruit and symptoms of premature fruit decay. Remember, the flies favor shady, moist regions of the planting. Flies can be discouraged by harvesting regularly to prevent the buildup of overripe fruit, removing all rotten or cull fruit from the field, and pruning out excessive vegetative growth that provides shade and cover for the flies.

 

Other IPM Web Pages
Michigan State University
Penn State University
University of New Hampshire

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                      Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Town Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly trap catch 7/20/17 Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly trap catch 7/27/17 Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly trap catch 8/3/17
Wells 8 12 12
Sanford 6 16 8
Limington 7 21 233
Limerick 4 18 19
Cape Elizabeth 37 68 65
Buxton 3 5 14
New Gloucester 298 600 780
Bowdoinham 28 74 128
Dresden 2 13 47
Freeport 4 10 3
Poland Spring 2 4 22
Mechanic Falls 0 0
Monmouth 5 1 2
Wales 121 78 85
Farmington 9 141 123
Fayette 5 7 8

Spotted Wing Drosophila Alert: July 21, 2017

Friday, July 21st, 2017
Male and Female Spotted Wing Drosophila

Male and Female Spotted Wing Drosophila, image by Alan Kenage, Capital Press

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA ALERT: JULY 21, 2017

Click on photos to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

There has been an increase in spotted wing drosophila activity at most trapping sites this week (see table below). Reports from throughout the northeast suggest a similar trend. This is significantly earlier activity than we have seen in recent years, and some of the trap counts are already well above what we consider potentially damaging to ripening berry crops, especially raspberries and blueberries.  Research suggests that when 6 to 10 flies are caught in a yeast-baited trap in a week, larvae will start appearing in the fruit.

We expect that spotted wing drosophila populations (SWD) will continue to build rapidly in the coming weeks as more eggs are laid in the fruit that is now ripening. Growers should set out traps, if you haven’t already. Start protective sprays on any berries that have begun to ripen when more than four spotted wing drosophila flies are caught in a trap, or any larvae are noticed in the fruit. Look for fruit flies hovering around fruit and symptoms of premature fruit decay. Remember, the flies favor shady, moist regions of the planting.

Insects in Spotted Wing Drosophila Trap

Insects in Spotted Wing Drosophila Trap, Male SWD Circled, photo by Kaytlin Woodman

You can find directions for making a home-made SWD monitoring trap on our SWD blog. An effective commercial trap and bait is now available from Scentry.  The trap is reusable and the bait lasts 4-6weeks.  Cost for both is about $15 plus shipping, it is available from Great Lakes IPM Company (http://www.greatlakesipm.com/).

Other IPM Web Pages
Michigan State University
Penn State University
University of New Hampshire

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                      Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

 

Town Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 7/6/17 Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly trap catch 7/13/17 Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly trap catch 7/20/17
Wells 19 8
Sanford 0 4 6
Limington 4 2 7
Limerick 1 3 4
Cape Elizabeth 19 21 37
Buxton 12 6 3
New Gloucester 3 30 298
Bowdoinham 2 10 28
Dresden 0 0 2
Freeport 2 0 4
Poland Spring 1 2 2
Mechanic Falls 14 5 0
Monmouth 2 4 5
Wales 110 121
Farmington 0 3 9
Fayette 6 3 5

 

 

 

 

Spotted Wing Drosophila Alert: July 17, 2017

Monday, July 17th, 2017
Male Spotted Wing Drosophila

Male Spotted Wing Drosophila, photo by Griffin Dill. Actual size: 2-3 mm.

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA ALERT: JULY 17, 2017

Click on photos to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

We have found numerous spotted wing drosophila (SWD) fruit flies in raspberry and highbush blueberry plantings in Maine over the past week, in nearly every location that we have set up traps (see table below). This information compliments reports from throughout the northeast that SWD is active and in higher numbers much earlier than we have seen in recent years.

Some of the fly counts are already well above what we would consider potentially damaging to ripening berry crops, especially raspberries and blueberries. Research in Maine and other regions suggests that when 6 to 10 flies are caught in a yeast-baited trap in a week, larvae will start appearing in the fruit.

Spotted wing drosophila populations are likely to build rapidly in the coming weeks as more food (fruit) becomes available for the flies, especially if conditions remain warm and we get some rain. Now is the time to set out traps, if you haven’t already. Start protective sprays on any berries that have begun to ripen, when more than four spotted wing drosophila flies are caught in a trap, or any larvae are noticed in the fruit. Look for fruit flies hovering around fruit and symptoms of premature fruit decay.

Research has shown that dry conditions and exposure reduce the number of eggs these insects will lay in the fruit. This supports our recommendations to open up your berry plantings by pruning, especially low growth, as these insects favor dark, moist conditions, close to the ground.

Based on what we know so far about this pest, here are six rules for managing spotted wing drosophila.

  1. Monitor for the flies with traps, and for the larvae in fruit.
  2. Spray regularly and often once flies have been found in the field (1-2/week).
  3. Harvest fruit regularly and often; do not leave any ripe/rotten fruit in the field.
  4. Sort fruit at harvest; do not leave any soft fruit in the container to be sold.
  5. Chill all fruit immediately after harvest to 38ºF (or as close as you can) for at least 12 hours to slow development of any eggs or larvae.
  6. Prune the planting to open up the canopy and create dry, light conditions.

Products that provide good control of drosophila on berry crops include spinosad (Radiant® for strawberries, Delegate® for raspberries and blueberries), Asana®, Brigade®, Danitol®, malathion, Exirel® (blueberries only) and Assail®. Research suggests that adding table sugar to group 4A insecticides, such as Assail®, may improve their effectiveness. The recommended rate would be 1-2 lbs. sugar per 100 gallons of spray. Please check product labels for rates, post-harvest intervals and safety precautions. Keeping fields clean of overripe and rotten fruit will also help reduce the incidence of this insect.

Characteristics of Insecticides for Spotted Wing Drosophila Control

Trade Name Days to Harvest
Blueberry
Days of Residual
Assail® 1 5-7
Mustang Max® 1 7
Bifenture® 1 (3 raspberry) 7
Brigade® 1 (3 raspberry) 7
Danitol® 3 7
Delegate® 3 (1 raspberry) 7
Entrust® 3 (1 raspberry) 3-5
Exirel® 3 (not for raspberry) 5-7
Imidan® 3 (not for raspberry) 5-7

 

drosophila trap

Drosophila Trap, photo by David Handley

A Simple Monitoring Trap for Spotted Wing Drosophila

The trap body is made from a 16 ounce red plastic cup (we use Solo Brand P16RLR). You’ll need one that has a tight fitting lid (we use Solo Brand 626TS). Using a 1/8” hole punch (available through art suppliers), punch about 15 holes in a row around the cup just under the lip about 1/2” apart. Leave about 2” of the diameter of the rim with no holes so that liquid can be poured in and out. Punch a second row of holes just under the first row, to give you a total of 30, 1/8” holes. Use a black permanent marker to paint a 1/2” wide black strip around the cup under the rim, right over the holes you punched. To support the trap, cut a wooden tomato stake down to about 30”. Attach a 4” or larger hose clamp near the top of the stake to act as a cup holder for the trap. (We just punched a hole in the metal band of the hose clamp and attached it to the stake with a flat-headed wood screw.) Place the trap holder in a shady, moist place in or near the fruit planting, with the cup height about 18” off the ground. Fill the trap with 4 to 6 ounces of apple cider vinegar, water + sugar + yeast, or whatever bait you prefer. It is best to add a few drops of unscented soap to break the surface tension of the liquid. Place the lid on the cup to keep rain and critters from getting in, and place the trap in the holder. Adjust the hose clamp so that the trap fits in snugly but the trap holes are not covered up. Empty and re-bait the trap every week. Do not pour out the old bait on the ground near the trap, as this will draw flies away from it.

An effective commercial trap and bait is now available from Scentry. The trap is reusable and the bait lasts 4-6weeks. Cost for both is about $15 plus shipping, it is available from Great Lakes IPM Company (http://www.greatlakesipm.com/).

Other IPM Web Pages
Michigan State University
Penn State University
University of New Hampshire

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                      Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Town Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly trap catch 7/6/17 Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly trap catch 7/12/17
Wells 19
Sanford 0 4
Limington 4 2
Limerick 1 3
Cape Elizabeth 19 21
Buxton 12 6
New Gloucester 3 30
Bowdoinham 2 10
Dresden 0 0
Freeport 2 0
Poland Spring 1 2
Mechanic Falls 14 5
Monmouth 2 4
Wales 110
Farmington 0 3
Fayette 6 3

Spotted Wing Drosophila Update: November 4, 2016

Friday, November 4th, 2016

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA UPDATE: NOVEMBER 4, 2016

Click on photo to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

Spotted Wing Drosophila Trap Catch

Spotted Wing Drosophila Trap Catch, photo by Christina Hillier

Warmer temperatures and some rain have resulted in an upsurge of spotted wing drosophila trap catches in some locations, while numbers continued a downward trend in others. Once the weather settles into a colder pattern, we expect fly populations will decline rapidly, based on our experience in previous years. Our monitoring sites are done harvesting for the season, and we have removed our traps from the fields. If you still have any fields or high tunnels being harvested, drosophila pose a significant threat to any remaining fruit. A 5 to 7 day spray interval is recommended to prevent infestations of larvae. See the New England Small Fruit Management Guide for pesticide options.

We’d like to thank the farmers who allowed us to set up traps in their fields and share the data with you. Thanks also to our scouts, Lindsey Ridlon, Shannon Buzzell, Hannah Kerrigan, Danielle Murray, and Pat McManus. Special thanks to Christina Hillier for counting all those flies!

Town Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 10/21/16 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 10/28/16 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 11/04/16
Limington* 303 301 1,077
Limerick 2,832 1,722 11,472
Wells 677 539 171
Cape Elizabeth 1,976 1,384 347
Bowdoinham 198 132 390
Dresden 4,264 431 2,992
Freeport 109 132 11
Poland Spring 3,336 1,066 442
Mechanic Falls 136 138 104
Monmouth* 4,312 625 232
Wales 176 134 298
Wayne 9,880 5,472 9,592
Farmington 2,376 1,712 968
*unsprayed planting

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

For more information on identifying spotted wing drosophila (SWD) and updates on populations in Maine, visit our SWD blog.

IPM Web Pages:
Michigan State University
Penn State University
University of New Hampshire

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

 

Spotted Wing Drosophila Update: October 28, 2016

Monday, October 31st, 2016

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA UPDATE: OCTOBER 28, 2016

Click on photo to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

Spotted Wing Drosophila

Spotted Wing Drosophila, photo by James Dill

Spotted wing drosophila trap catches continue a downward trend in most locations. A lack of hard frosts or consistently low temperatures over several days has prevented a sudden drop in numbers such as we have seen in past years. But, as temperatures gradually cool, day lengths get shorter and food supplies deplete, populations are declining slowly. Most fields are done harvest for the season, and in such cases, further sprays are not necessary. Spraying fields in the fall after harvest will not significantly reduce fly populations in your fields next year, because most of them will fly in from other locations. For any fields or high tunnels that are still being harvested, drosophila numbers are still high enough to threaten any remaining fruit. A 5 to 7 day spray interval is recommended to prevent infestations of larvae. Once harvest is complete, clean up the field of any rotten fruit and debris to discourage overwintering adults. See the New England Small Fruit Management Guide for pesticide options.

 

Town Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 10/14/16 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 10/21/16 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 10/28/16
Limington* 115 303 301
Limerick 2752 2832 1722
Wells 11 677 539
Cape Elizabeth 180 1976 1384
Bowdoinham 55 198 132
Dresden 5144 4264 431
Freeport 68 109 132
Poland Spring 566 3336 1066
Mechanic Falls 54 136 138
Monmouth* 1039 4312 625
Wales 156 176 134
Wayne 3432 9880 5472
Farmington 1646 2376 1712
*unsprayed planting

 

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

For more information on identifying spotted wing drosophila (SWD) and updates on populations in Maine, visit our SWD blog.

IPM Web Pages:
Michigan State University
Penn State University
University of New Hampshire

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

 

 

Spotted Wing Drosophila Update: October 14, 2016

Friday, October 14th, 2016

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA UPDATE: OCTOBER 14, 2016

Click on photo to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

Spotted Wing Drosophila Larva in Blackberry

SWD Larvae in Blackberry, photo by David Handley

Spotted wing drosophila trap catches appear to be on a downward trend in most locations this week, as factors such as frost, drought and declining food supplies may be taking their toll. However, numbers are still high enough to threaten any fruit remaining in the field. A five-day spray interval on any fruit remaining is recommended to prevent infestations of larvae. Once harvest is complete, cleaning up the field of rotten fruit and debris may help reduce overwintering populations of adults. See the New England Small Fruit Management Guide for pesticide options.

Town Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/30/16 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 10/6/16 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 10/14/16
Limington* 1095 249 115
Limerick 7472 2056 2752
Wells 147 313 11
Cape Elizabeth 1328 4208 180
Bowdoinham 106 41 55
Dresden 4896 6120 5144
Freeport 198 53 68
Poland Spring 3144 1179 566
Mechanic Falls 649 87 54
Monmouth* 980 323 1039
Wales 106 243 156
Wayne 14016 6376 3432
Farmington 5536 2064 1646
*unsprayed planting

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

For more information on identifying spotted wing drosophila (SWD) and updates on populations in Maine, visit our SWD blog.

IPM Web Pages:
Michigan State University
Penn State University
University of New Hampshire

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spotted Wing Drosophila Update: October 6, 2016

Friday, October 7th, 2016

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA UPDATE: OCTOBER 6, 2016

Click on photo to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

Spotted Wing Drosophila Larvae in Raspberry

Spotted Wing Drosophila Larvae in Raspberry, photo by David Handley

Spotted wing drosophila trap catches remained high this week, although numbers varied from field to field, being higher at some sites but lower at others. Larvae and flies are still plentiful in unsprayed fruit and waste. We are starting to see female flies that are considerably larger than those found earlier. Based on research at Cornell University, this suggests some of these flies may be of the generation that will attempt to overwinter. The high numbers of flies will put a lot of pressure on the small amount of fruit remaining to be harvested. Therefore a five-day spray interval on any fruit remaining is recommended to prevent infestations of larvae. Continue to inspect all pre-picked fruit carefully for possible infestation, and chill berries immediately, holding in a cooler until shipped. Rotate insecticide spray materials as much as possible to prevent resistance, and follow all label directions, precautions and days to harvests restrictions. (See the New England Small Fruit Management Guide for more information and details.)

Town Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/23/16 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/30/16 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 10/6/16
Limington* 642 1095 249
Limerick 797 7472 2056
Wells 147 147 313
Cape Elizabeth 1081 (2 weeks) 1328 4208
Bowdoinham 106 41
Dresden 385 4896 6120
Freeport 208 198 53
Poland Spring 687 3144 1179
Mechanic Falls 206 649 87
Monmouth* 581 980 323
Wales 91 106 243
Wayne 4520 14016 6376
Farmington 578 5536 2064
*unsprayed planting

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

For more information on identifying spotted wing drosophila (SWD) and updates on populations in Maine, visit our SWD blog.

IPM Web Pages:
Michigan State University
Penn State University
University of New Hampshire

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

 

Spotted Wing Drosophila Update: September 30, 2016

Friday, September 30th, 2016

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA UPDATE: SEPTEMBER 30, 2016

Click on photo to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

Male Spotted Wing Drosophila

Male Spotted Wing Drosophila, photo by Griffin Dill. Actual size: 2-3 mm.

Spotted wing drosophila trap catch numbers rose significantly in many locations this week, resulting in the highest counts of the season thus far. Growers with high populations are finding that a seven-day spray interval is no longer providing adequate control, and most are moving to a five-day spray interval on any fruit remaining to be harvested. Larvae and flies are plentiful in unsprayed fruit, such as wild berries surrounding cultivated plantings and waste piles. Be sure that all pre-picked fruit is carefully inspected for possible infestation, chilled immediately, and held in a cooler until shipped. Rotate insecticide spray materials to prevent the development of resistance; and follow all label directions, precautions and days to harvests restrictions. (See the New England Small Fruit Management Guide for more information and details.)

Town Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/15/16 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/23/16 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/30/16
Limington* 787 642 1095
Limerick 437 797 7472
Wells 184 147 147
Cape Elizabeth 1081 (2 weeks) 1328
Bowdoinham 31 106
Dresden 549 385 4896
Freeport 362 208 198
Poland Spring 68 687 3144
Mechanic Falls 283 206 649
Monmouth* 528 581 980
Wales 153 91 106
Wayne 4520 14016
Farmington 840 578 5536
*unsprayed planting

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

For more information on identifying spotted wing drosophila (SWD) and updates on populations in Maine, visit our SWD blog.

IPM Web Pages:
Michigan State University
Penn State University
University of New Hampshire

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

 

 

 

 

Spotted Wing Drosophila Update: September 23, 2016

Friday, September 23rd, 2016

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA UPDATE: SEPTEMBER 23, 2016

Click on photo to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

Spotted Wing Drosophila Larvain in Raspberry

SWD Larvae in Raspberry, photo by David Handley

Spotted wing drosophila trap catch numbers remained very high this week at all of our trapping sites. However, growers report that harvested fruit (raspberries and blueberries) are clean when they have maintained a 5-6 day spray program. Larvae are easy to find in unsprayed fields and in overripe and waste fruit left in fields. At this time, a 5 to 6 day insecticide spray schedule is needed to keep fruit free of larvae. Fruit that feels abnormally soft is likely infested with larvae and should not be sold. All pre-picked fruit intended for sale should be chilled immediately, and held in a cooler until shipped. Rotate insecticide spray materials to prevent the development of resistance, and follow all label directions, precautions and days to harvests restrictions. (See the New England Small Fruit Management Guide for more information and details.)

 

Town Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/9/16 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/15/16 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/23/16
Limington* 627 787 642
Limerick 506 437 797
Wells 756 184 147
Cape Elizabeth 1180 1081 (2 weeks)
Bowdoinham 173 31
Dresden 961 549 385
Freeport 234 362 208
Poland Spring 269 68 687
Mechanic Falls 183 283 206
Monmouth* 254 528 581
Wales 2191 153 91
Wayne 4520
Farmington 840 578
*unsprayed planting

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

For more information on identifying spotted wing drosophila (SWD) and updates on populations in Maine, visit our SWD blog.

IPM Web Pages:
Michigan State University
Penn State University
University of New Hampshire

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

 

 

Spotted Wing Drosophila Update: September 15, 2016

Thursday, September 15th, 2016

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA UPDATE: SEPTEMBER 15, 2016

Click on photo to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

Male and Female Spotted Wing Drosophila Flies

Male (left) and Female (right) Spotted Wing Drosophila, photo by Griffin Dill. Actual size: 2-3 mm.

Spotted wing drosophila trap catch numbers were again some of the highest numbers of the season this week, but there were also noticeable drops in numbers at sites that have been sprayed since our count last week. We continue to find larvae in overripe and waste fruit in plantings, emphasizing the importance of keeping up with harvest and keeping fields free of waste fruit, if at all possible. Frequent (5 to 6 day), regular insecticide sprays continue to be essential to keep fruit free of larvae. Good grading of fruit and chilling immediately after harvest are also important to prevent infested fruit from getting into customer hands. Remember to rotate insecticide spray materials to prevent the development of resistance, and follow all label directions, precautions and days to harvests restrictions. (See the New England Small Fruit Management Guide for more information and details.)

 

Town Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/1/16 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/9/16 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/15/16
Limington* 178 627 787
Limerick 34 506 437
Wells 128 756 184
Cape Elizabeth 153 1180
Bowdoinham 25 173 31
Dresden 193 961 549
Freeport 13 234 362
Poland Spring 29 269 68
Mechanic Falls 95 183 283
Monmouth* 732 254 528
Wales 1001 2191 153
Farmington 840
*unsprayed planting

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

For more information on identifying spotted wing drosophila (SWD) and updates on populations in Maine, visit our SWD blog.

IPM Web Pages:
Michigan State University
Penn State University
University of New Hampshire

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.