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Spotted Wing Drosophila Alert: September 25, 2018

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA ALERT: SEPTEMBER 25, 2018

Click on photos to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

We regret that we have not been able to keep up regular weekly maintenance of all of our spotted wing drosophila (SWD) traps over the past few weeks, due to a shortage of help and conflicting schedules. We hope to keep the traps up for one more week, as frost is now bringing an end to the season for most parts of the state. In general, drosophila captures have been high enough to warrant regular sprays on all berry crops that are still being harvested, e.g. fall raspberries and day-neutral strawberries. While populations have been variable from site to site, ranging from the tens to the thousands, they have been high enough to result in rapid infestation of fruit if left untreated. (See table below.) A 5 to 7-day spray schedule on all ripening fruit should be adequate for most plantings. Make sure your sprayer is providing good coverage of the plant surface, especially in the lower part of the canopy, and try to keep any overripe or rotten fruit out of the field. Weather predictions suggest that conditions will continue to be good for SWD to infesting any ripening fruit, until either the fruit is gone, or we have experienced several hard frosts.

For more information on identifying spotted wing drosophila and updates on populations around the state, visit our SWD blog.

Other IPM Web Pages
Michigan State University
Penn State University
University of New Hampshire

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                         UMaine Extension Diagnostic Research Lab
P.O. Box 179                               Pest Management Unit
52 U.S. Route 202                     17 Godfrey Drive
Monmouth, ME 04259             Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                             1.800.287.0279

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Town Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly trap catch 8/17/18 Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly trap catch 8/24/18 Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly trap catch 8/31/18 Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/7/18
Wells 5 12 48 114
Sanford 7
Limington 23 180 1600
Limerick 1 108 1680
Buxton 58
Bowdoinham 152 15 74 68
Cape Elizabeth 1441 353 312 197
Dresden 10 440
Freeport 7 173
Poland Spring 7 10 190 325
Mechanic Falls 2 13 66
Monmouth 74 469 1336 861
Readfield 51 140
Farmington 3 154 296
Fayette 0
Wales 4616 123 1512 328
Wayne 1 8 32

 

 

Image Description: Insects in Spotted Wing Drosophila Trap

Image Description: Spotted Wing Drosophila Emerging from Fall Raspberries

Spotted Wing Drosophila Alert: August 17, 2018

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA ALERT: AUGUST 17, 2018

Click on photo to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

Captures of spotted wing drosophila (SWD) fruit flies in vinegar/yeast traps in raspberry and highbush blueberry plantings increased significantly at some locations this week, and is above threshold levels at most sites. Our highest counts of the season were found in raspberry plantings in Wales and Cape Elizabeth, with numbers now reaching into the thousands. (See table below.) Weather predictions suggest that conditions will continue to be good for SWD to continue increasing in fall raspberries, late blueberries, elderberries and fall strawberries. Growers with these crops should be putting on regular protective sprays if more than 4 flies have been captured in traps in a week. At this point a 5 to 7-day spray schedule should be adequate for most plantings. Make sure your sprayer is providing good coverage of the plant surface, especially in the lower part of the canopy.

For more information on identifying spotted wing drosophila and updates on populations around the state, visit our SWD blog.

Other IPM Web Pages
Michigan State University
Penn State University
University of New Hampshire

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                      UMaine Extension Diagnostic Research Lab
P.O. Box 179                             Pest Management Unit
52 US Route 202                     17 Godfrey Drive
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

 

Town Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly trap catch 8/3/18 Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly trap catch 8/10/18 Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly trap catch 8/17/18
Wells 0 0 5
Sanford 0 5 7
Limington 12 Trap down 23
Limerick 0 7 1
Buxton 0 11 58
Bowdoinham 2 34 152
Cape Elizabeth 1 18 1441
Dresden 5 49 10
Freeport 0 2 7
Poland Spring 0 2 7
Mechanic Falls 0 2 2
Monmouth 2 20 74
Readfield 12 17 51
Wales 2 216 4616
Farmington 1 0 3
Fayette 0 1 0
Wayne 0 0 1

 

 

Image Description: Spotted Wing Drosophila Larvae in Elderberries

Spotted Wing Drosophila Alert: August 10, 2018

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA ALERT: AUGUST 10, 2018

Click on photo to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

Captures of spotted wing drosophila (SWD) fruit flies in vinegar/yeast traps in raspberry and highbush blueberry plantings are now increasing in most locations, and at most sites counts rose above threshold levels, including one site with over 200 flies caught. (See table below.) The wet weather predicted for next week may further encourage SWD infestations, as these insects like moisture, and the rain will also lead to more rotten fruit in the field. Most summer-bearing raspberry fields are through or nearly through harvest, but fall fruiting raspberries and blackberries are now ripening and are very susceptible to infestation.  Later ripening blueberries and elderberries are also good hosts for SWD at this time. Growers with these crops should be putting on protective sprays. Pay close attention to product pre-harvest intervals and limits on the number of applications allowed for each product, to develop a management strategy that will be most effective for your situation.

For more information on identifying spotted wing drosophila and updates on populations around the state, visit our SWD blog.

Other IPM Web Pages
Michigan State University
Penn State University
University of New Hampshire

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                       Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                              491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259           Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                            1.800.287.0279

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

 

Town Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly
trap catch 7/27/18
Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly
trap catch 8/3/18
Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly
trap catch 8/10/18
Wells 0 0
Sanford 3 0 5
Limington 1 12 Trap down
Limerick 0 0 7
Buxton 5 0 11
Bowdoinham 1 2 34
Cape Elizabeth 1 18
Dresden 2 5 49
Freeport 0 0 2
Poland Spring 0 0 2
Mechanic Falls 0 0 2
Monmouth 0 2 20
Readfield 1 12 17
Wales 2 216
Farmington 1 0
Fayette 0 0 1
Wayne 0 0

 

 

 

Image Description: Spotted Wing Drosophila Damage in Elderberry Plant

Spotted Wing Drosophila Alert: August 6, 2018

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA ALERT: AUGUST 6, 2018

Click on photos to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

Captures of spotted wing drosophila (SWD) fruit flies in vinegar/yeast traps in raspberry and highbush blueberry plantings remained low in most locations, although at two sites ((Limington, Readfield) counts rose above threshold levels. (See table below.) The recent warm, wet weather will encourage SWD infestations, however, as it may lead to more rotten fruit in the field and increase ambient moisture levels. Growers should try to keep rotten fruit out of the field as much as possible and encourage dry conditions by pruning out excess growth, especially near the base of the plantings. Growers who have been catching flies in their traps for more than one week and have ripening fruit should put on a protectant spray.

We expect spotted wing drosophila populations to increase significantly in the coming weeks as more ripe and rotten fruit becomes available for the flies. Protective sprays should be applied if more than four spotted wing drosophila flies are caught in a trap, flies are caught consistently for more than one week, or any larvae are noticed in the fruit. Look for fruit flies hovering around fruit and symptoms of premature fruit decay.

For more information on identifying spotted wing drosophila and updates on populations around the state, visit our SWD blog.

Other IPM Web Pages
Michigan State University
Penn State University
University of New Hampshire

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                      Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Town Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly trap catch 7/20/18 Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly trap catch 7/27/18 Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly trap catch 8/3/18
Wells 0
Sanford 13 3 0
Limington 1 1 12
Limerick 0 0 0
Buxton 3 5 0
Bowdoinham 1 1 2
Cape Elizabeth 1
Dresden 5 2 5
Freeport 0 0 0
Poland Spring 1 0 0
Mechanic Falls 0 0 0
Monmouth 3 0 2
Readfield 0 1 12
Wales 5 2
Farmington 8 1
Fayette 0 0 0
Wayne 0 0

 

 

 

Image Description: Spotted Wing Drosophila Larvae in Blueberry

Spotted Wing Drosophila Alert: July 27, 2018

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA ALERT:  JULY 27, 2018

Click on photos to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

We continue to capture spotted wing drosophila fruit flies in vinegar/yeast traps in raspberry and highbush blueberry plantings this week, but mostly in low numbers. (See table below.) While these counts may indicate that populations are still fairly low in berry fields, growers who have been catching flies in their traps for more than one week and have ripening fruit should put on a protectant spray. We have had reports of raspberry fruit infested with larvae from an unsprayed field.

Spotted wing drosophila populations are expected to rise in the coming weeks as more ripe fruit becomes available for the flies, especially if conditions remain warm and wet. Set out traps now, if you haven’t already. Start protective sprays on any berries that have begun to ripen when:  more than four spotted wing drosophila flies are caught in a trap, flies are caught consistently for more than one week, or any larvae are noticed in the fruit. Look for fruit flies hovering around fruit and symptoms of premature fruit decay.

Remember to keep waste fruit out of the field as much as possible. Harvest often and regularly to prevent the presence of overripe fruit; and open up the planting to more light by pruning out excess vegetative growth, especially in the lower part of the bush canopy.

For more information on identifying spotted wing drosophila (SWD) and updates on populations around the state, visit our SWD blog.

Other IPM Web Pages
Michigan State University
Penn State University
University of New Hampshire

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                      Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

 

Town Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly trap catch 7/20/18 Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly trap catch 7/27/18
Sanford 13 3
Limington 1 1
Limerick 0 0
Buxton 3 5
Bowdoinham 1 1
Dresden 5 2
Freeport 0 0
Poland Spring 1 0
Mechanic Falls 0 0
Monmouth 3 0
Readfield 0 1
Wales 5
Farmington 8
Fayette 0 0
Wayne 0

 

 

Image Description: Spotted Wing Drosophila Larvae in Raspberry

Image Description: Male and Female Spotted Wing Drosophila

Spotted Wing Drosophila Alert: July 20, 2018

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA ALERT: JULY 20, 2018

Click on photos to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

We have found spotted wing drosophila (SWD) fruit flies in raspberry and highbush blueberry plantings in Maine over the past week, in most of the locations where we have set up traps. (See table below.) This compliments reports from throughout the northeast that SWD is active and in high numbers very early this season.

Some of the fly counts this week are already above what we consider potentially damaging to ripening berry crops, especially raspberries and blueberries. Research in Maine and other regions suggests that when 6 to 10 flies are caught in a yeast-baited trap in a week, larvae will start appearing in the fruit.

Spotted wing drosophila populations are likely to build rapidly in the coming weeks as more food (fruit) becomes available for the flies, especially if conditions remain warm and we get some rain. Now is the time to set out traps, if you haven’t already. Start protective sprays on any berries that have begun to ripen, when more than four spotted wing drosophila flies are caught in a trap, or any larvae are noticed in the fruit. Look for fruit flies hovering around fruit and symptoms of premature fruit decay.

Research has shown that dry conditions and exposure reduce the number of eggs these insects will lay in the fruit. This supports our recommendations to open up your berry plantings by pruning, especially low growth, as these insects favor dark, moist conditions, close to the ground.

Important points for managing spotted wing drosophila include:

  1. Monitor for the flies with traps, and for the larvae in fruit.
  2. Spray regularly and often once flies have been found in the field (every 5 to 7 days).
  3. Harvest fruit regularly and often; do not leave any ripe/rotten fruit in the field.
  4. Sort fruit at harvest; do not leave any soft fruit in the container to be sold.
  5. Chill all fruit immediately after harvest to 38ºF (or as close as you can) for at least 12 hours to slow or stop development of any eggs or larvae.
  6. Prune the planting, especially the lower region, to open up the canopy and create dry, light conditions.

Products that provide good control of drosophila on berry crops include spinosad (Radiant® for strawberries, Delegate® for raspberries and blueberries), Asana®, Brigade®, Danitol®, malathion, Exirel® (blueberries only) and Assail®. Research suggests that adding table sugar to group 4A insecticides, such as Assail®, may improve their effectiveness. The recommended rate would be 1-2 lbs. sugar per 100 gallons of spray. Also, it is recommended to add 4-16 oz Nu Film P®/100 gal with all materials to improve SWD efficacy and, if it rains after you spray, re-apply a pesticide material. (Read the label for any re-application restrictions of the same material.) Please check product labels for rates, post-harvest intervals and safety precautions.

Click here for a current list (courtesy of Mary Concklin at UConn Extension) of labeled spray materials for SWD.

Characteristics of Insecticides for Spotted Wing Drosophila Control

Trade Name Days to Harvest
Blueberry
Days of Residual
Assail® 1 5-7
Mustang Max® 1 7
Bifenture® 1 (3 raspberry) 7
Brigade® 1 (3 raspberry) 7
Danitol® 3 7
Delegate® 3 (1 raspberry) 7
Entrust® 3 (1 raspberry) 3-5
Exirel® 3 (not for raspberry) 5-7
Imidan® 3 (not for raspberry) 5-7

 

A Simple Monitoring Trap for Spotted Wing Drosophila:
The trap body is made from a 16-ounce red plastic cup (we use Solo Brand P16RLR). You’ll need one that has a tight-fitting lid (we use Solo Brand 626TS). Using a 1/8” hole punch (available through art suppliers), punch about 15 holes in a row around the cup just under the lip about 1/2” apart. Leave about 2” of the diameter of the rim with no holes so that liquid can be poured in and out. Punch a second row of holes just under the first row, to give you a total of 30, 1/8” holes. Use a black permanent marker to paint a 1/2” wide black strip around the cup under the rim, right over the holes you punched. To support the trap, cut a wooden tomato stake down to about 30”. Attach a 4” or larger hose clamp near the top of the stake to act as a cup holder for the trap. (We just punched a hole in the metal band of the hose clamp and attached it to the stake with a flat-headed wood screw.) Place the trap holder in a shady, moist place in or near the fruit planting, with the cup height 12” to 18” off the ground. Fill the trap with 4 to 6 ounces of apple cider vinegar, water + sugar + yeast, or whatever bait you prefer. It is best to add a few drops of unscented soap to break the surface tension of the liquid. Place the lid on the cup to keep rain and critters from getting in, and place the trap in the holder. Adjust the hose clamp so that the trap fits in snugly but the trap holes are not covered up. Empty and re-bait the trap every week. Do not pour out the old bait on the ground near the trap, as this will draw flies away from it.

An effective commercial trap and bait is now available from Scentry. The trap is reusable and the bait lasts 4-6weeks. Cost for both is about $15 plus shipping, it is available from Great Lakes IPM Company.

For more information on identifying spotted wing drosophila (SWD) and updates on populations around the state, visit our SWD blog.

Other IPM Web Pages
Michigan State University
Penn State University
University of New Hampshire

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                      Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Town Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly trap catch 7/20/18
Sanford 13
Limington 1
Limerick 0
Buxton 3
Bowdoinham 1
Dresden 5
Freeport 0
Poland Spring 1
Mechanic Falls 0
Monmouth 3
Readfield 0
Wales 5
Farmington 8
Fayette 0
Wayne 0

Image Description: Male Spotted Wing Drosophila

Image Description: Male and Female Spotted Wing Drosophila Flies

Image Description: Drosophila Trap

Spotted Wing Drosophila Alert: October 20, 2017

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA ALERT:  OCTOBER 20, 2017

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

Trap counts of spotted wing drosophila rose dramatically in some locations over the past week. We are now finding fly numbers in the thousands at more than half of our trapping sites. (See table below.) All sites remain well over the threshold for larvae infestation if susceptible crops are not protected with regular sprays or netting. A spray interval of every 5 to 7 days should be adequate to prevent any marketable fruit remaining in the field from becoming infested. Continue harvest regularly and often, and keep overripe and rotten fruit out of the field as much as possible. Long range weather forecasts suggest continued warmer than normal temperatures ahead, which will both extend the late berry season and likely keep spotted wing drosophila pressure high.

For more information on identifying spotted wing drosophila and updates on populations around the state, visit our SWD blog.

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                      Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Town Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 10/6/17 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 10/13/17 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 10/20/17
Wells 567 88 8664
Limington 87 152 3488
Limerick 1808 187 637
Cape Elizabeth 124 750 2424
New Gloucester 209 408 1272
Bowdoinham 563 244 1584
Dresden 4376 2816 3368
Freeport 133 655 407
Poland Spring 440 294 3504
Mechanic Falls 55 31 546
Monmouth 4696 1188 3368
Wales 343 372 325
Farmington 7568 5680 5112

 

 

Image Description: Spotted Wing Drosophila Trap Catch

Image Description: Spotted Wing Drosophila Larvae in Raspberry

Spotted Wing Drosophila Alert: October 13, 2017

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA ALERT:  10/13/2017

Click on photos to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

Spotted wing drosophila populations continue to be high but variable this week. While some locations saw decreases in the weekly trap catch, others had the highest numbers of the season. (See table below.) This variability can be due to a number of factors, including changing availability of food, ambient moisture, temperature, and insecticide applications. Despite the variation however, all sites were over the threshold for infestation if fruit were left untreated; and growers who still have ripening fruit should continue to protect their crop on a spray interval of 5 to 7 days to prevent fruit from becoming infested. Also, continue harvest regularly and often, and keep overripe and rotten fruit out of the field as much as possible. Long range weather forecasts suggest a warmer than normal stretch of days ahead. While this is great for extending the late berry season, it also means that spotted wing drosophila will likely continue to be a threat.

For more information on identifying spotted wing drosophila and updates on populations around the state, visit our SWD blog.

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                      Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Town Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/29/17 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 10/6/17 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 10/13/17
Wells 527 567 88
Limington 373 80 152
Limerick 174 799 187
Cape Elizabeth 879 204 750
New Gloucester 341 259 408
Bowdoinham 264 746 244
Dresden 554 2064 2816
Freeport 359 111 655
Poland Spring 1866 2608 294
Mechanic Falls 113 51 31
Monmouth 63 1624 1188
Wales 104 450 372
Farmington 286 440 5680

Image Description: Spotted Wing Drosophila Damage in Elderberry Plant

Image Description: Male and Female Spotted Wing Drosophila Flies

Spotted Wing Drosophila Alert: October 10, 2017

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA ALERT:  OCTOBER 10, 2017

Click on photos to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

Spotted wing drosophila numbers increased significantly at some of the trapping sites this week, although there doesn’t seem to be a pattern to those increases geographically. (See table below.) Fly numbers at other locations remained relatively stable or had slight decreases. However, all sites are still well over the threshold for infestation if fruit are left untreated. We have had several calls over the past two weeks regarding late ripening fruit (strawberries and elderberries) being infested with larvae. Therefore, growers who still have ripening fruit should continue to protect their crop on a spray interval of 5 to 7 days to prevent fruit from becoming infested It is also important to keep wounded and rotten fruit out of the field as much as possible. Allowing it to stay on the plant or on the ground will attract more flies and provide food and shelter for more eggs and larvae. With the long-term forecasts predicting continued warmer than normal temperatures, it is likely that spotted wing drosophila will continue to threaten late ripening berries.

For more information on identifying spotted wing drosophila and updates on populations around the state, visit our SWD blog.

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                      Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Town Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/22/17 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/29/17 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 10/6/17
Wells 45 527 567
Limington 373 80 87
Limerick 174 799 1808
Cape Elizabeth 879 204 124
New Gloucester 341 259 209
Bowdoinham 264 746 563
Dresden 554 2064 4376
Freeport 359 111 133
Poland Spring 1866 2608 440
Mechanic Falls 113 51 55
Monmouth 63 1624 4696
Wales 104 450 343
Farmington 286 440 7568

Image Description: Spotted Wing Drosophila Larvae in Elderberries

Image Description: Insects in Spotted Wing Drosophila Trap

Spotted Wing Drosophila Alert: September 22, 2017

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA ALERT: SEPTEMBER 22, 2017

Click on photos to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

There was a downturn in spotted wing drosophila numbers at most of our trapping locations this week, although it is important to note that all locations still had populations high enough to cause significant damage to any ripening fruit remaining in fields. (See table below.) Fall raspberries and day-neutral strawberries are especially susceptible at this time. Growers with any ripening fruit should continue protecting their crop against egg-laying drosophila. A minimum spray interval of 5 to 7 days is recommended to keep fruit from becoming infested.

For more information on identifying spotted wing drosophila and updates on populations around the state, visit our SWD blog.

Quick Farm Labor Survey: This may be the easiest survey you have ever been asked to complete! It’s 10 questions that can be answered with a simple click of a button. We have heard your requests to provide educational resources to help you recruit, retain, and manage labor on your farms and at your agricultural businesses. We are looking to get information to help us focus on what resources would be especially helpful. Just 3 minutes of your time would make a big difference to us.

Please respond ASAP and before Sunday, October 8, 2017. To complete this survey please click here. Thanks again, for your time!

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                      Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Town Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/8/17 Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/15/17 Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/22/17
Wells 273 330 45
Limington 568 734 373
Limerick 326 1771 174
Cape Elizabeth 2968 1308 879
New Gloucester 272 383 341
Bowdoinham 449 792 264
Dresden 666 1584 554
Freeport 164 132 359
Poland Spring 807 1145 1866
Mechanic Falls 77 48 113
Monmouth 434 470 63
Wales 122 86 104
Farmington 1728 1848 286

Image Description: Spotted Wing Drosophila

Image Description: Spotted Wing Drosophila Maggot in Raspberry


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University of Maine Cooperative Extension


Contact Information

Cooperative Extension at Highmoor Farm
52 U.S. Route 202
Monmouth, Maine 04259-0179
Phone: 207.933.2100
The University of Maine
Orono, Maine 04469
207.581.1110
A Member of the University of Maine System