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Fair Information - 4-H Rules and Regulations: General Requirements for Fair Exhibits in Kennebec County

  1. WHO can submit projects for display at Kennebec County fairs:
    • Kennebec county 4-H member in good standing and currently enrolled in club displaying the exhibits.
    • All independent members who also submit an annual project record. Please bring your in progress project record at time of set up.
    • Space will be reserved on a first come, first served basis. Space may be limited due to volume.
    • 4-H Members in good standing from other counties may exhibit, please see fair specific information for more detail and eligibility.
  1. WHAT can be exhibited:
    • All exhibits approved by and entered through the club leader or 4-H volunteer.
    • Items made, produced or prepared in the approved project area during the current 4-H year (Oct 1 – Sept 30). Projects should demonstrate skills learned over time.
    • Project completed after fair exhibit season of current year may be displayed the following year.
      • (ie: ESE, CWF, Congress, Conference, camps)
    • One item per project area (see list below) unless otherwise noted.
    • Exhibits shall follow the Exhibit Requirements listed under each project ~ read carefully ~ if you have questions please call Extension Office 622-7546.
    • Exhibits not following the Exhibit Requirements shall receive no premium.
    • The decisions of the judge(s) are final.
    • The fair will afford the best protection possible for all exhibits; however Extension and the Fair distinctly disclaim any liability for the loss or damage to exhibits.
    • No posters, we have limited space at most fairs. Please check with us regarding space.
    • No written school reports accepted.
    • No Kits are accepted with exception to the following: (“Kits” = articles of pre-cut or pre-formed pieces that are assembled)
      • Cloverbud projects
      • Commercial Crafts like Latch Hook rugs, Candle making, Stitchery, Models and Rocketry projects
  1. WHERE can projects be exhibited:
    • Pittston Fair: Mid July
    • Monmouth Fair: Beginning of August
    • Windsor Fair: End of Aug/ Beginning of Sept
    • Litchfield Fair: Beginning of September; open to Androscoggin/ Sagadahoc County clubs as well
    • Clinton Fair: Beginning of September
    • Skowhegan Fair (check with Extension to be sure invitation is currently extended and get their rules on exhibits)
  1. WHEN exhibits are set up and torn down:
    • Traditionally set up of exhibits is one to two days before the fair opens.
    • Judging is done before the fair is open.
    • Traditionally tear down is towards the afternoon of the last day of the fair.
    • Contact Extension office for more details on times, dates and locations.
  1. WHY take the time to exhibit at fairs:
    • Fairs enable Members the opportunity to exhibit their mastery of certain life and project skills as a showcase of their learning to the public and 4-H community. Recognition encourages more involvement and learning in the project!
    • Fairs offer the general public a glimpse at all the different project areas in which 4-H is active- STEM- including Animal Science, Community Service, the Arts, Healthy Living, and more! 4-H is still meeting the needs of young people in topic areas they love!
    • While working on projects the Members are learning valuable Life Skills that will serve them through life, such as time management, teamwork, communication, public speaking, record keeping, resiliency, and confidence.
    • Projects offer ways to showcase talents, hobbies, and skills of 4-H Leaders, 4-H Parents, 4-H Members and community partners.
  1. REQUIREMENTS FOR EXHIBITING PROJECTS

In Kennebec County 4-H we manage 5 County based fairs, which is a huge undertaking! At this time we do not require Members to submit their projects individually to judges or to verbally share their project based learning experience. The best way we have to gauge what Members are learning through their projects is through thoughtful reflections. Cards may be filled out throughout the year, as Members complete projects. Cards are available at the Extension Office all year as well as printable versions online.

Each entry must have 1 card:

  1. Feedback and Youth Reflection Form

Do not remove this card between fairs. There will be no Life Skills Cards or Exhibit cards judged in Kennebec County. If you are exhibiting projects in another county prior to coming to Kennebec County fairs, please use our new Feedback Form and have youth complete that Reflection.

Any considerations that should be taken into account by the judges should be attached in an envelope to the 4-H Exhibit & Judging Card by the leader or parent. Please see our judges rubric for the Feedback Form and Youth Reflection to see if the considerations given on judging the projects are appropriate, if you would like additional considerations please email alisha.r.targonski@maine.edu two weeks prior to the specific fair in question.

Club Leader Responsibilities in Exhibiting

Official Registration Form for Exhibiting at Kennebec County Fairs

Page ___1__ of ___1___ Date: July 1

Club Name:    Green Clovers Club    Leader: Chris Clover          Name of Exhibitor:  Jamie Green            Age: 10

Description of Exhibit Project Pittston Fair

Place/Prem

Monmouth Fair
Place/Prem
Windsor Fair
Place/Prem
Clinton Fair
Place/Prem
Litchfield Fair
Place/Prem
3D Printed 4 Leaf Clover Computer Science X X X X
Collection of 10 rocks  Geology X X X

 

 

Judging will be done using the Danish Judging Method.

PROJECT EXHIBIT AREAS AND THEIR REQUIREMENTS

ALL PROJECTS SHALL BE MADE OF QUALITY ITEMS REPRESENTING MAINE 4-H MEMBERS, THEIR CLUB AND COUNTY


4-H Department Section 1 — AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE

ANIMAL SCIENCE PROJECTS                                                                  

WHAT QUALIFIES AS AN ANIMAL PROJECT?

  1. HEALTH — An item made by member or 4 photos including captions (see Exhibit of Photo rule) describing/illustrating:
    • health issues,
    • health facts,
    • illnesses or diseases the animal can get or for which it needs to be vaccinated
    • The information must contain the following (age appropriate):
      • Identify health issue/illness/disease
      • What causes it
      • How to prevent it
      • How to treat it if contracted
  2. SAFETY — An item made by member, or 4 photos including captions (see Exhibit of Photo Rule) describing or illustrating safety of/in animal project:
    • Working around animals
    • Handling animal
    • Item made to increase safety while working animal
    • No first aid kits
  3. NUTRITION — An item made displaying the following:
    • Example of feed, following layout of list below
    • Example of feed label; following layout of list below
    • Vital nutrients needed for animal (labeled and age appropriate)
    • The information shall explain (age appropriate):
      • Weights and measures of nutrients for project
      • Analysis of nutrients (fat, protein, vitamins etc)
      • How often to feed
      • Benefits of nutrients (how it effects the animal and why)
  4. HABITAT/HOUSING — Four photos including captions (see Exhibit of Photo rule) or 3D display including captions showing:
    • Habitat/housing, requirements, management of housing
    • Pasture management
    • Manure management
    • The information shall explain (age appropriate):
      • Why displayed housing is required
      • Explanation of habitat
      • Benefits of good pasture management
      • Benefits of good manure management
  5. TRAINING — Any item or 4 photos with captions (see Exhibit of Photo rule) (age appropriate) with explanation of at least 4 of the following:
    • How the item is used
    • For what purpose
    • Explanation of appropriate age of animal at which this training item should be introduced and why
    • What the training is
    • What is the end result of training
    • What you are doing while training
    • Why you are training
    • Why did you choose this particular kind of training tool

BEEKEEPING

  1. One 1/2 pint of honey (strained) from member’s beehive with label and explanation of how it is preserved.
  2. Display showing beekeeping, social structure of bees, the beehive, or how to extract honey, etc.

FIELD CROPS & FRUITS

GARDEN CROPS

MAPLE SYRUP

One labeled 1/2 pint or larger canning jar of syrup, sealed.

VETERINARY SCIENCE

One 8 1/2″ x 11″ display on: the parts of an animal; normal vital signs; diseases; poisonous plants; heredity; nutrition; or allergies.


4-H Department Section 2 — ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

ALTERNATIVE ENERGY PROJECT

Any quality item made in this project by the member, or 4 pictures demonstrating knowledge learned, and that could inform the public about this project (see Exhibit of Photo rule). Labeling must include information on the process, the lessons learned by the Member, the outcome or success of the project, and why such a project is important to the community.

AQUATIC LIFE

Any item made by member with explanation OR 4 regular sized photos of aquatic life taken by member labeled to show what was learned in the project (see Exhibit of Photo rule). Labeling must include information on the process, the lessons learned by the Member, the outcome or success of the project, and why such a project is important to the community.

EARTH CONNECTIONS

8 1/2″ x 11″ display or scale model on the ecology of a plant or animal species or on a habitat or community studied in the project. Labeling must include information on the process, the lessons learned by the Member, the outcome or success of the project, and why such a project is important to the community.

ENTOMOLOGY-STUDY OF INSECTS

A series of four regular size photos (see Exhibit of Photo rule), mounted as a unit and individually labeled, that tell a story of what has been done in the project during the past year. Include a 3″x 5″ card with an explanation of the project. Labeling must include information on the process, the lessons learned by the Member, the outcome or success of the project, and why such a project is important to the community.

Examples:

  1. Planting a butterfly garden and displaying photos of butterflies visiting the garden
  2. A non-toxic way to eliminate pests
  3. Pictures of insects in their natural habitat (See Exhibit of Photo rule)
  4. Exhibit insect specimens neatly mounted in a case protected by a see-through cover, and labeled with their name on entomology labels. 4-H Members who cannot write small enough to fit the name on the label may have help.
    • Beginner — a minimum of 15 different mounted species of insects with common names
    • Level 2 — a minimum of 25 different mounted species in at least 5 orders, with common names
    • Level 3 — a minimum of 35 different mounted species in at least 6 orders with scientific names
    • Level 4 — a minimum of 45 different mounted species in at least 7 orders with scientific names

FOREST CONSERVATION

  1. Six mounted photos that illustrate poor forest conservation practices, labeled to tell what the poor practice is and what might be done to “correct” the problem. (See Exhibit of Photo rule)
  2. Six mounted “before and after” photos that illustrate the member’s own erosion prevention project, such as building diversion ditches or water bars, plantings of seedlings or ground cover, etc. (See Exhibit of Photo rule)

FORESTRY

Specimens must be labeled with common and scientific names.

  1. 1st Year – Collection of leaves or needles, and twigs with winter buds, of at least 10 tree species commercially important to Maine.
  2. 2nd Year – Collection of seeds of 10 tree species commercially important to Maine.
  3. 3rd Year – Collection of at least 4 disease, insect, or animal damaged specimens.
  4. 4th Year – Display of some phase of Industrial Forestry, such as Christmas tree production or commercial logging, etc.

GEOLOGY OR ROCKS & MINERALS

WILDFLOWER

A display of 10 different specimens in a field notebook, properly pressed, labeled with common and scientific names, and covered with a see-through cover for protection. Up to four specimens may be the member’s photographs or drawings of flowers on the endangered list.

WILDLIFE

Members may display up to 3.

  1. A birdhouse, feeder, or other item made by member during the project
  2. An 8 1/2″ x 11″ display with 4 labeled sketches or 4 labeled & mounted photos of the wildlife studied
  3. Track casts made by member
  4. Display of other items collected. (See Exhibit of Photo rule in Photography section.)

SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION

  1. Six mounted photos that illustrate poor conservation practices, labeled to tell what the poor practice is and what might be done to “correct” the problem.
  2. Six mounted “before and after” photos that illustrate the member’s own conservation project.

4-H Department Section 3 — CITIZENSHIP

SERVICE

(unlimited)

“I pledge my hands to larger service.” Service is a pillar of the 4-H program and service projects are those that serve a particular need in a community and for which a Member volunteers their time, energy, talent, and leadership. Service projects displayed at our fairs should demonstrate caring, compassion, and leadership.

CITIZENSHIP

(unlimited)

4‑H citizenship programs empower young people to be well-informed citizens who are actively engaged in their communities and the world. Citizenship (while including service and leadership) for these projects refers to civic engagement, advocacy, activism, civic education, global citizenship, history and cultural heritage.

LEADERSHIP

(unlimited)

4-H leadership holds many hats. Leadership can be at the club level by holding office or being a mentor or teacher to other members. Leadership can be at the county level by working with the Teen Council or at the state level in working with a committee or event. Leadership is also the personal development of character, confidence, respect and mutual understanding. May have more than one leadership project; these projects will only be counted in one exhibit area. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING

(unlimited — displaying different speaking events)
A display of speech (including the speech development process) or four regular size pictures mounted as a unit and individually labeled that illustrates to the public what the member has actively done in the project during this 4-H year. Labeling must include information on the process, the lessons learned by the Member, the outcome or success of the project, and why such a project is important to the community.

SELF DETERMINED/ENTREPRENEURSHIP

(Formerly) CREATIVITY UNLIMITED


4-H Department Section 4 — HOME SCIENCES AND EXPRESSIVE ARTS

ART

CHILDCARE

  1. A safe and sanitary toy, game, puzzle, or child’s item made by the member, showing appropriate skills for the Member’s age and the number of years on this project. List the age of child for which the toy or game was made and an explanation of how to play/use. Make sure this is a quality item.
  2. Emergency plan for babysitting,
  3. 4 pictures of getting 1st aid training and/or CPR training as to why this is important and valuable.

COMMERCIAL CRAFTS

FOR CLOVERBUDS ONLY (up to 3): NO COLORING BOOKS

For 5 – 8 year old members only. This category is for non-original arts and crafts, such as Artex kits, paint-by-number, craft kits, etc.

A KIT EXHIBIT MUST BE MARKED AS A KIT. Paintings must be framed properly.

CRAFTS

Art, design, creativity, skill building, confidence, and hours of practice: all components of crafts. Please, select crafts to display that show innovation, technique, diligence, age appropriate and skill appropriate challenge.

 

 

4-H members may exhibit a project from any of the following categories:

CREATIVE WRITING

  1. Story-telling, with cover page (illustrated cover is optional)
  2. Poem written by member, framed or in protective plastic sheet protector
  3. Cartoon book (with theme), with illustrated cover
  4. Fact or Fiction, with cover page (illustrated cover is optional)

INDOOR GARDENING AND ARRANGEMENTS

  1. One house plant grown by 4-H Member.
  2. A dish garden or terrarium.
  3. A flower arrangement. Must be grown by Member and labeled with common and scientific names.
  4. A winter centerpiece or bouquet using dried flowers, grasses or grains. Driftwood, stones, evergreens, figurines may be used. No fresh flowers. Dried flowers must be grown by member and labeled with common and scientific names.

GENEALOGY

  1. Level 1 – illustrating 3 generations starting with member (either one side or both side of parents showing at least 2 generations from (1) member…(2) mother & (3) grandmother –and/or father & grandfather)
  2. Level 2 – illustrating 4 generations starting with member (either one side or both side of parents recording at least 4 generations…(1) member, (2)mom, (3) grandmother, (4) great grandmother and/or father, grandfather, great grandfather
  3. Level 3 – illustrating 6 generations (same as above showing 6 generations)

HOME IMPROVEMENT

  1. Redecorating or renovating a room
  2. Building project such as a deck, porch or tool shed
  3. Landscaping a yard, etc.
  4. An item made by member which enhances your home.

MUSIC & MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
(Up to 3 different instruments)

A display that illustrates to the public what has been done in the project during the current 4-H year. Include a written explanation of the exhibit on a 3″x5″ card. Separate entries may be submitted for each musical instrument, as long as each is conducted as a separate project. Must be involved in an organized group, band, chorus, or practice regularly and/or take lessons.

PERFORMING ARTS
(Up to 3 different project types)

A series of four pictures of the 4-H member performing in public (see Exhibit of Photo rule- page14) individually labeled which tell a story. If more than one performing arts project, each must be a completely different event (dance, singing, acting). This could also include behind the scene activities such as set design, staging, lighting, directing, costuming.

EXHIBIT OF PHOTO RULE — General Standards for 4-H Projects (New 2017)

PHOTOGRAPHY

READING

SEWING
(Up to 3 different items/level)

Any one item made by the member and approved by the leader. Provide a list of skills learned and illustrated by the item. Clothes hanger must be provided for each exhibit. The “skill requirements” are listed on our “4-H Clothing Project Advisors Reference Sheet” on next page.

  1. Unit 1: Beginner Sewing (up to 2 years in project) Sewing skills: selection of tools, learning to hand sew, use sewing machine, choose & prepare fabric, mark and cut fabric.
  2. Unit 2 – 5 skills from Beginner/Intermediate required
  3. Unit 3 – 3 Advanced skill requirements plus at least 3 from Beginner/Intermediate skill list.

4-H CLOTHING PROJECT ADVISER’S REFERENCE SHEET

The 4-H Clothing Advisor works with young people, helping them to develop skills in clothing construction and to learn to be a wise clothing consumer. Your role is one of guidance where the 4-H’er “learns by doing.” Developmental levels are a helpful, positive way for assessing the member’s ability and growth in the 4-H Clothing/Sewing Project. Competence, not age or number of years the project is taken, is the factor, which helps the Leader and the Member decide the level in which they belong.

In addition to the materials provided to the member, you or the 4-H’ers parent may have books on clothing construction. REMEMBER, THERE IS NO 4-H WAY! There are many acceptable methods of construction. Depending on the fabric and the person’s skills and preference, several alternatives can be used. What may work well for one person can be a disaster for the next.

UNIT 1 — BEGINNER/INTERMEDIATE — The 4-H clothing member is expected to accomplish basic skills and to learn more difficult tasks:

UNIT 2 — ADVANCED The 4-H clothing member is expected to utilize the sewing skills applicable to the garment being made. He/she will learn how to work with fabrics needing special handling and develop techniques requiring time, patience, and talent. Some advanced skills include:

  1. Special Stitching
  1. Special Trim
  1. Special Closures
  1. Special Fabrics
  1. Other Special Techniques

4-H Department Section 5 — FOODS                                    

FOOD DRYING
(up to 3)
(all ages)

Dried products must be in an air tight container or clean canning jar with 4-H label completed, including identified dried item, and drying method used, and drying time.

Judging: will be on freshness and uniformity of color; fruits and vegetables to be of uniform in size and shape, and to be crisp and brittle; herbs to easily pulverize.

  1. Dried herbs 2. Dried fruits 3. Dried vegetables 4. Dried Roots 5. Fruit Leathers 6. Dried Meats (advanced only)

FOOD PREPARATION
(up to 3 different projects per level)

Foods must be securely wrapped or sealed and will be judged on taste, texture, and appearance (presentation). Include complete recipe on a 3″ x 5″ card. DO NOT enter no-bake cookies or dry ingredients in a jar. Item must be cooked

FOOD PRESERVATION
(up to 3 different projects per age level)

Must use screw top canning jars and 4-H Canning Labels with all the information completed, or homemade labels with product name and category (i.e. Cloverbud Fruits or Intermediate Pickles), Member’s name, date, and an explanation of the process used. (Labels are available from the Extension Office.) No freezer jams; no paraffin wax on jams/jellies. Two jars of fruit must be 2 different fruit varieties and recipes.


4-H Department Section 6 — HEALTHY LIFESTYLES

HEALTH (Human)
(Up to 3 different projects)

No blankets or first aid kits

  1. Nutrition
  2. The benefits of exercise
  3. Emotional health
  4. Sports health
  5. An item made by the Member with explanation of its need
  6. Any item that identifies, treats, or prevents health conditions with an explanation its need

PHYSICAL FITNESS

Four regular size pictures (see Exhibit of Photo rule) mounted as a unit and individually labeled that illustrates to the public what has been done in the project during this 4-H year. Labeling must include information on the process, the lessons learned by the Member, the outcome or success of the project, and why such a project is important to the community. All project activities must be about the member’s participation in the fitness activity. (Not a sport.) Being a spectator does not count.

SAFETY
(Up to 3 different projects)

Any item made by the member that could be used to inform the public about safety considerations or potential hazards in some area of public concern, with an explanation on a 3”x 5” card. Card must include information on the process for making the item, the lessons learned by the Member, the outcome or success of the project, and why such a project is important to the community. Not a first aid kit.

SPORTS

A display or four regular size pictures (see Exhibit of Photo rule) mounted as a unit and individually labeled that illustrates to the public what has been done in the project during this 4-H year. Labeling must include information on the process, the lessons learned by the Member, the outcome or success of the project, and why such a project is important to the community. All project activities must be about the member’s participation in seasonal sport. Being a spectator does not count. Separate entries may be submitted for each sport, as long as each is conducted as a separate project.

If team sport list name of team, pictures shall reflect playing on the team and show proper safety equipment for the sport represented


4-H Department Section 7 —  SCIENCES

CHEMISTRY

  1. Using the “Science Fun with Kitchen Chemistry” curriculum, create a display that explores how matter changes form, the properties of acids and bases, any experiments that can be done using items found in a kitchen.
  2. Experiments in chemistry must be safe and adult approved. Chemistry displays must include:
    1. Materials list
    2. Hypothesis: What do you think will happen?
    3. Description of the process: Step by step of what you are doing.
    4. Results: Did it work? What happened? Do you need to re-test it?
    5. Draw conclusions based on results: Did it it align with your original hypothesis? Does this give you new information for future experiments?

COMPUTER SCIENCE

  1. A computer program developed, written and printed out by the Member, with instructions for the use described.
  2. A 3-D printed object, or printed computer design of object, with 3”x5” note card describing the purpose/use of object, information on the design process.
  3. A poster or display illustrating something the member learned related to computers (hardware, software coding, web design, etc).

ELECTRICAL

  1. A display of an electrical circuit or a display illustrating how a circuit works.
  2. A product such as a lamp, game, robot, extension cord or drop light, etc. built and properly wired by the member.

ENGINEERING
(Up to 3 different projects)

A constructed or created item demonstrating/illustrating the application of science in the design, planning, construction or creation of the item. 4 Photos are acceptable (see Exhibit of Photo rule). Labeling must include information on the process, the lessons learned by the Member, the outcome or success of the project, and why such a project is important to the community. The project item can be from any branch of engineering such as:

MECHANICAL SCIENCES
(Up to 3 different projects)

An 8 1/2″x 11″ exhibit showing one of the following:

  1. engine design and operation
  2. care and maintenance of the machine
  3. safety considerations
  4. ignition or fuel system
  5. similar exhibit.

Separate entries may be submitted for each type of machinery as long as each is conducted as a separate project.

ROBOTICS
(Up to 3 different projects)

Quality project made demonstrating the knowledge learned, showing a robot that can accomplish a task. It may be or may not be computer controlled. Four photos (see Exhibit of Photo rule) are accepted with detailed information with results of your programming. Or your robot journal showing at least 4 different robots, their programming and results of the program including movement, noise and lights.

ROCKETRY
(Up to 3 different projects)

A model rocket may be used for display. Any creative way of presenting to the public such things as:

1. rocket design,
2. operation,
3. safety considerations,
4. ignition or fuel systems;
5 similar exhibit.

WOODWORKING AND METALWORKING
(Up to 3 different projects)

  1. Any object made primarily from metal using a process such as metal machining, welding, forging, etc.
  2. Project built from wood (no kits) — appropriate woodworking skills to demonstrate: jointing, cutting, fitting, sanding, finishing, etc.
  3. Carved Project
  4. Wood burning Project
  5. Detailed woodworking plan if project is not portable. Check with Extension Office on dimensions.

4-H Department Section 8 — OUTDOOR RECREATION

BICYCLE & RECREATIONAL VEHICLE SAFETY

Any item made by the member or four regular sized photos (see Exhibit of Photo rule) or drawings properly mounted and labeled showing maintenance or a story about safety when participating in these activities. Labeling must include information on the process, the lessons learned by the Member, the outcome or success of the project, and why such a project is important to the community.

OUTDOOR RECREATION
(Up to 3 projects from different listed categories)

  1. A series of four regular size photos (see Exhibit of Photo rule), mounted and individually labeled, telling a story of a project done in the outdoors during the past year. Labeling must include information on the process, the lessons learned by the Member, the outcome or success of the project, and why such a project is important to the community.
    • Example: An Outdoor Recreation project could be a planned white water rafting trip. You could display photos of how you mapped your route, safety precautions, best techniques to use while on the water, etc. Your display would include labels that state how fun these activities are, how they are a great way to appreciate nature, keep a healthy and active lifestyle, and how clean water is important not just for our safety but for the tourism industry.
  2. Item made by member to be used for an outdoor project such as a hiking stick or a sluice box.
  3. Display map of trails, made using GPS/GIS technology.
  4. Display map of trails, made using compass.
  5. Safety Display
  6. Educational Display

Examples of Outdoor Recreation: hiking trips, mountain climbing, rock climbing, ice climbing, gold panning, all-terrain vehicle, off road vehicle, snowmobile, shooting sports, sports fishing, camping, biking

CAMPING

  1. A camping item made in the project, with explanation
  2. A display with ten knots you’ve learned in the project
  3. A sturdy, handmade model of an Appalachian Shelter
  4. A display that illustrates “no-trace” camping techniques
  5. A written schedule and map of a camping and hiking trip taken this 4-H year, can include four photos (see Exhibit of Photo rule in Photography section) to illustrate trip.

FISHING

HUNTING
(Up to 3 different species)


4-H Department Section 9 — 4-H CLUB EXHIBITS                                           

4-H CLUB EXHIBIT

Clubs displaying any projects or exhibits at Kennebec County Fairs will automatically be eligible for a Club Exhibit award. Club Exhibits are our best promotional tool at County Fairs — they are accessible all the time to the public and communicate all we do in 4-H, the talent of our young people, and the breadth of education and development that happens all year. Animal Science project clubs are encouraged and eligible to display projects in the Exhibition Halls. We want to make sure that the 4-H Story is clear and positively displayed. Depending on the size and participation rates of our Clubs, the size allotted to each club may vary at each fair and also year to year.

Scoring Rubric

Points will be awarded based on how well displays meet or exceed these expectations for a total of up to 100 points.

Overall Appearance (40 points): Projects are displayed by subject topic to clearly demonstrate to public the different projects learned over the year. Projects demonstrate learning and mastery of skills over time. Projects are displayed well in the space given. Display appears well organized.
Creativity (15 points): Space may be decorated to enhance the overall appearance of display including: streamers, balloons, dried flowers, table cloths, etc. Space may creatively demonstrate 4-H concept, 4-H education, overall 4-H year experience. Please do not include items that may be confused as 4-H projects such as quilts, craft or decorative items not made by Members as part of their Club experience.
Club Sign (10 points): for the name of Club, judged on appearance and execution. Club Signs (not to be made of cardboard or paper) must include Club name and Town/County for the public to see.
4-H Promotion (10 points): The display promotes the 4-H program and the educational opportunities in 4-H. Public understands 4-H better from the display. This could include but is not limited to items such as small notes on Project Areas, or the 4-H Pledge, or the 4-H Motto, or the 4 H’s, etc.
Community Service (25 points): Club display should include group community service project, clearly labeled; can be a collage, scrapbook, several scrapbook pages, or small poster. Looking for pictures and a clear description of the different service projects completed.

Club display awards have Fair specific premiums. (See Specific Information for each fair, available from the Extension Office.)


4-H Department Section 10 — 4-H EDUCATIONAL EXHIBITS                          

4-H EDUCATIONAL EXHIBITS

Educational Exhibits are an important aspect of Kennebec County 4-H Fairs; they communicate to the public what 4-H is all about- exploring the world around us in fun and creative ways! They are a perfect way to showcase 4-H learning. Educational Exhibits should communicate with both judges and the public the educational focus your Club had this year, exhibiting young people in the process of learning, as well as a way for Members to exhibit the outcome of that learning. Educational Exhibits should focus on one central concept and have a clear connection to their 4-H project work. Educational Exhibits will be displayed within the Club Display space at Kennebec County Fairs (space allowing), Members’ projects may be displayed to enhance Educational Exhibit and showcase the project’s connection with the Exhibit Theme as well as the long-term education.

Scoring Rubric

Points will be awarded based on how well displays meet or exceed these expectations for a total of up to 100 points.

Organization (20 points): Exhibit flows nicely, has pleasing overall appearance, lettering is neat and easily read from a distance. Title is large, easily read from a distance, clearly and concisely communicates the focus of the educational display.
Exhibit Theme (15 points): The exhibit should have unity and should convey the subject of the Exhibit at a glance.
Creativity (20 points): Content is visually interesting, and has aesthetically pleasing use of color, pictures, diagrams, and props/projects.
Educational Content (35 points): Exhibits a 4-H project area or activity. Educational outcomes (what you learned, how you learned it through 4-H, why it is important) are easily identified and are age appropriate for members. References given for cited information clearly displayed.
Club Information (10 points): Including Club Name, Town or County, list of first names and ages of Members who worked on display.

Premiums for Educational Exhibits:

1- $40.00
2- $35.00
3- $30.00
4- $25.00
5- $20.00
6- $10.00
All other exhibits $5.00 (up to 10 exhibits)


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University of Maine Cooperative Extension


Contact Information

Cooperative Extension in Kennebec County
125 State Street, 3rd Floor
Augusta, Maine 04330-5692
Phone: 207.622.7546 or 1.800.287.1481 (in Maine)E-mail: extension.kennebec@maine.edu
The University of Maine
Orono, Maine 04469
207.581.1110
A Member of the University of Maine System