Skip Navigation

Bulletin #1160, Why Consumers Buy — and Don’t Buy — Your Farm Direct Products - Chart and Table Descriptions

Print Friendly

Chart 1: Pie chart showing the total response rate of 47% for urban and 53% for rural.

back to publication #1160

Chart 2: A stacked bar chart showing the age distribution of respondents’ household members. Under ten years of age rural 49, urban 30; ten to nineteen years rural 44, urban 46; twenty to thirty-four years rural 32, urban 42; thirty-five to fifty-four years rural 147, urban 124; fifty-five plus years rural 199, urban 162.

back to publication #1160

Chart 3: A bar chart showing the number of outlets known by respondents, average known by outlet. Farm stands 1.9 known by rural, 1.1 known by urban; pick-your-own 1.2 known by rural, 1 known by urban; tailgate 0.5 known by rural, 0.7 known by urban; home delivery none known by rural, 0.1 known by urban; Farmers’ Market 0.6 known by rural, 1.2 known by urban; grocery 1.9 known by rural, 3 known by urban.

back to publication #1160

Chart 4: A bar chart showing the percent of respondents aware of outlets. Farm stands 86% of rural, 61% of urban; pick-your-own 63% of rural, 45% of urban; tailgate 27% of rural, 36% of urban; Farmers’ Market 31% of rural, 81% of urban; grocery 80 of rural, 86% of urban.

back to publication #1160

Chart 5: A bar chart showing the average distance traveled to outlet. Farm stands 7.5 miles for rural, 5.8 miles for urban; pick-your-own 11.5 miles for rural, 12.6 miles for urban; tailgate 10.7 miles for rural, 4.1 miles for urban; Farmers’ Market 15.4 miles for rural, 3.5 miles for urban; grocery 10.6 miles for rural, 2.9 miles for urban.

back to publication #1160

Chart 6: A bar chart showing the distance respondents were willing to travel to buy from farm direct markets, percent of respondents by distance in miles. Less than three miles, 7% rural and 7% urban; three to five miles, 20% rural and 32% urban; six to ten miles, 28% rural and 40% urban; eleven to fifteen miles 12% rural and 8% urban; sixteen to twenty miles, 18% rural and 5% urban; over twenty miles 14% rural and 7% urban.

back to publication #1160

Chart 7a: A bar chart showing where rural residents got information about outlets, percent by media type. Roadside signs, 34% farm stands, 22% pick-your-own, 7% tailgate market, and 12% farmers market; word of mouth, 28% farm stands, 16% pick-your-own, 4% tailgate market, and 8% farmers market; newspaper 18% farm stands, 16% pick-your-own, 1% tailgate market, and 11% farmers market, direct mail 0% farm stands, 1% pick-your-own, 0% tailgate market, and 1% farmers market; radio 5% farm stands, 8% pick-your-own, 0% tailgate market, and 3% farmers market; and television 3% farm stands, 8% pick-your-own, 0% tailgate market, and 3% farmers market.

back to publication #1160

Chart 7b: A bar chart showing where urban residents got information about outlets, percent by media type. Roadside signs, 30% farm stands, 15% pick-your-own, 14% tailgate market, and 27% farmers market; word of mouth, 22% farm stands, 15% pick-your-own, 8% tailgate market, and 25% farmers market; newspaper 12% farm stands, 20% pick-your-own, 3% tailgate market, and 21% farmers market, direct mail 1% farm stands, 1% pick-your-own, 0% tailgate market, and 1% farmers market; radio 6% farm stands, 9% pick-your-own, 0% tailgate market, and 3% farmers market; and television 3% farm stands, 8% pick-your-own, 1% tailgate market, and 6% farmers market.

back to publication #1160

Chart 8a: A bar chart showing for rural respondents their typical expenditure on food for each visit to different outlets by percent purchasing less than $10, $10 to $20 or over $20.  Farm stand, 46.4 percent spent less than $10, 34.8 percent spent between $10 and $20 and 4.3 percent spent over $20; pick-your-own, 16.4 percent spent less than $10, 27.1 percent spent between $10 and $20 and 10.6 percent spent over $20; tailgate markets 12.1 percent spent less than $10, 5.3 percent spent between $10 and $20 and 0.5 percent spent over $20; home delivery, 2.9 percent spent less than $10, 0 percent spent between $10 and $20 and 2.4 percent spent over $20; farmers market 14.5 percent spent less than $10, 9.7 percent spent between $10 and $20 and 4.8 percent spent over $20.

back to publication #1160

Chart 8b: A bar chart showing for urban respondents their typical expenditure on food for each visit to different outlets by percent purchasing less than $10, $10 to $20 or over $20. Farm stand, 38.7 percent spent less than $10, 23.7 percent spent between $10 and $20 and 4.3 percent spent over $20; pick-your-own, 16.7 percent spent less than $10, 22 percent spent between $10 and $20 and 8.1 percent spent over $20; tailgate markets 22 percent spent less than $10, 9.1 percent spent between $10 and $20 and 1.1 percent spent over $20; home delivery, 2.7 percent spent less than $10, 1.1 percent spent between $10 and $20 and 1.6 percent spent over $20; farmers market 33.9 percent spent less than $10, 30.6 percent spent between $10 and $20 and 12.9 percent spent over $20.

back to publication #1160

Table 1: Family average weekly expenditure on food. During the growing season (June to October) 20% of respondents spent up to $10 per week on fruits & vegetables, 35% spent $10 to $20 per week and 36% spent over $20 per week. 16% spent up to $10 per week on meat, 31% spent $10 to $20 and 31% spent over $20. 23% spent up to $10 on other livestock products, 16% spent $10 to $20, and 13% spent over $20. During the rest of the year (November to May) 20% of respondents spent up to $10 per week on fruits & vegetables, 27% spent $10 to $20 per week and 37% spent over $20 per week. 14% spent up to $10 per week on meat, 31% spent $10 to $20 and 34% spent over $20. 21% spent up to $10 on other livestock products, 14% spent $10 to $20, and 12% spent over $20.

back to publication #1160

Chart 9a: A stacked bar chart showing purchases of various products from outlets by number of rural respondents. Vegetables were purchased by 80 respondents at farm stands, 14 at pick-your-own, 22 at farmers markets, 15 at tailgate markets and 62 at grocery stores. Fruits were purchased by 61 respondents at farm stands, 47 at pick-your-own, 15 at farmers markets, 10 at tailgate markets and 61 at grocery stores. Eggs were purchased by 25 respondents at farm stands, none at pick-your-own, 9 at farmers markets, 1 at tailgate markets and 58 at grocery stores. Flowers were purchased by 24 respondents at farm stands, 3 at pick-your-own, 7 at farmers markets, 5 at tailgate markets and 8 at grocery stores. Organic produce was purchased by 16 respondents at farm stands, 4 at pick-your-own, 11 at farmers markets, 5 at tailgate markets and 13 at grocery stores. Homemade foods were purchased by 16 respondents at farm stands, none at pick-your-own, 8 at farmers markets, 2 at tailgate markets and 6 at grocery stores. Greenhouse produce was purchased by 13 respondents at farm stands, 1 at pick-your-own, 3 at farmers markets, 1 at tailgate markets and 14 at grocery stores. Jams and jellies were purchased by 12 respondents at farm stands, 1 at pick-your-own, 6 at farmers markets, 1 at tailgate markets and 41 at grocery stores. Pickles were purchased by 10 respondents at farm stands, 2 at pick-your-own, 6 at farmers markets, 1 at tailgate markets and 42 at grocery stores.

back to publication #1160

Chart 9b: A stacked bar chart showing purchases of various products from outlets by number of urban respondents. Vegetables were purchased by 64 respondents at farm stands, 16 at pick-your-own, 64 at farmers markets, 30 at tailgate markets and 75 at grocery stores. Fruits were purchased by 49 respondents at farm stands, 47 at pick-your-own, 54 at farmers markets, 26 at tailgate markets and 75 at grocery stores. Eggs were purchased by 20 respondents at farm stands, none at pick-your-own, 24 at farmers markets, 5 at tailgate markets and 70 at grocery stores. Flowers were purchased by 23 respondents at farm stands, 4 at pick-your-own, 25 at farmers markets, 8 at tailgate markets and 23 at grocery stores. Organic produce was purchased by 20 respondents at farm stands, 5 at pick-your-own, 29 at farmers markets, 10 at tailgate markets and 23 at grocery stores. Homemade foods were purchased by 15 respondents at farm stands, 1 at pick-your-own, 27 at farmers markets, 4 at tailgate markets and 11 at grocery stores. Greenhouse produce was purchased by 16 respondents at farm stands, 1 at pick-your-own, 17 at farmers markets, 4 at tailgate markets and 24 at grocery stores. Jams and jellies were purchased by 18 respondents at farm stands, 1 at pick-your-own, 26 at farmers markets, 5 at tailgate markets and 56 at grocery stores. Pickles were purchased by 12 respondents at farm stands, 1 at pick-your-own, 16 at farmers markets, 3 at tailgate markets and 54 at grocery stores.

back to publication #1160

Chart 10: A bar chart showing products most likely to be purchased by either rural respondents or urban respondents. Apples would like to be purchased by 74 percent rural and 67 percent urban. Sweet corn would like to be purchased by 69 percent rural and 58 percent urban. Berries would like to be purchased by 50 percent rural and 51 percent urban. Potatoes would like to be purchased by 45 percent rural and 35 percent urban. Squash and pumpkins would like to be purchased by 44 percent rural and 44 percent urban. Cucumbers would like to be purchased by 29 percent rural and 35 percent urban. Tomatoes would like to be purchased by 29 percent rural and 47 percent urban. Maple syrup would like to be purchased by 25 percent rural and 18 percent urban. Bedding plants would like to be purchased by 21 percent rural and 15 percent urban. Fresh beans would like to be purchased by 18 percent rural and 22 percent urban. Beet greens would like to be purchased by 17 percent rural and 20 percent urban. Eggs would like to be purchased by 16 percent rural and 18 percent urban. Dry beans would like to be purchased by 14 percent rural and 6 percent urban. Landscape plants would like to be purchased by 14 percent rural and 8 percent urban. Peas would like to be purchased by 14 percent rural and 17 percent urban.

back to publication #1160

Chart 11: A pie chart showing fruits and vegetables typically processed by respondents. Potatoes were processed by 20 percent of respondents, tomatoes 15 percent, squash 11 percent, carrots 9 percent, sweet corn 9 percent, apples 8 percent, peas 7 percent, berries 6 percent, cabbage 5 percent, other 5 percent, fresh beans 4 percent and cucumbers 1 percent.

back to publication #1160

Chart 12a: A bar chart showing sources of fruit and vegetables for the families of all respondents that supplied either less than one quarter of the family’s produce, one quarter to one half of the family’s produce or more than one half of the family’s produce. Farm direct markets provided less than one quarter of produce for 44% of families, between one quarter and one half of produce for 10% of families and more than half of produce for 3% of families.    Grocery stores within 10 miles provided less than one quarter of produce for 10% of families, between one quarter and one half of produce for 12% of families and more than half of produce for 48% of families. Grocery stores located between 10 miles and 30 miles provided less than one quarter of produce for 11% of families, between one quarter and one half of produce for 7% of families and more than half of produce for 12% of families. Grocery stores located more than 30 miles away provided less than one quarter of produce for 12% of families, between one quarter and one half of produce for 2% of families and more than half of produce for 2% of families.

Produce from friends/ neighbor’s garden provided less than one quarter of produce for 27% of families, between one quarter and one half of produce for 4% of families and more than half of produce for 0% of families. Produce from the respondents garden provided less than one quarter of produce for 22% of families, between one quarter and one half of produce for 10% of families and more than half of produce for 6% of families.

back to publication #1160

Chart 12b: A bar chart showing sources of meat and livestock products for the families of all respondents that supplied either less than one quarter of the family’s meat and livestock products, one quarter to one half of the family’s meat and livestock products or more than one half of the family’s meat and livestock products. Farm direct markets provided less than one quarter of meat and livestock products for 18% of families, between one quarter and one half of meat and livestock products for 2% of families and more than half of meat and livestock products for 4% of families. Grocery stores within 10 miles provided less than one quarter of meat and livestock products for 6% of families, between one quarter and one half of meat and livestock products for 8% of families and more than half of meat and livestock products for 48% of families. Grocery stores located between 10 miles and 30 miles provided less than one quarter of meat and livestock products for 9% of families, between one quarter and one half of meat and livestock products for 6% of families and more than half of meat and livestock products for 17% of families. Grocery stores located more than 30 miles away provided less than one quarter of meat and livestock products for 10% of families, between one quarter and one half of meat and livestock products for 3% of families and more than half of meat and livestock products for 3% of families. Meat and livestock products from friends/ neighbor’s provided less than one quarter of meat and livestock products for 7% of families, between one quarter and one half of meat and livestock products for 1% of families and more than half of meat and livestock products for 1% of families. Meat and livestock products from the respondents garden provided less than one quarter of meat and livestock products for 5% of families, between one quarter and one half of meat and livestock products for 1% of families and more than half of meat and livestock products for 1% of families. meat and livestock products from the respondents own livestock provided less than one quarter of meat and livestock products for 6% of families, between one quarter and one half of meat and livestock products for 1% of families and more than half of meat and livestock products for 2% of families.

back to publication #1160

Chart 13: A stacked bar chart showing urban respondents’ reasons for shopping at farm direct outlets. Freshness was the reason 53% or respondents shopped at farm stands, 32% at pick-your-own, 22% from tailgate markets and 53% from farmers markets. Locally grown was the reason 52% or respondents shopped at farm stands, 30% at pick-your-own, 22% from tailgate markets and 51% from farmers markets. Support local farmers was the reason 49% or respondents shopped at farm stands, 30% at pick-your-own, 20% from tailgate markets and 47% from farmers markets. Quality was the reason 51% or respondents shopped at farm stands, 27% at pick-your-own, 21% from tailgate markets and 49% from farmers markets. Nutrition was the reason 35% or respondents shopped at farm stands, 20% at pick-your-own, 15% from tailgate markets and 36% from farmers markets. Value for money was the reason 28% or respondents shopped at farm stands, 26% at pick-your-own, 16% from tailgate markets and 23% from farmers markets. Appearance of products was the reason 32% or respondents shopped at farm stands, 17% at pick-your-own, 14% from tailgate markets and 32% from farmers markets.

back to publication #1160

Chart 14: A stacked bar chart showing rural respondents’ reasons for shopping at farm direct outlets. Freshness was the reason 69% or respondents shopped at farm stands, 30% at pick-your-own, 14% from tailgate markets and 19% from farmers markets. Locally grown was the reason 66% or respondents shopped at farm stands, 24% at pick-your-own, 12% from tailgate markets and 18% from farmers markets. Support local farmers was the reason 61% or respondents shopped at farm stands, 23% at pick-your-own, 12% from tailgate markets and 17% from farmers markets. Quality was the reason 60% or respondents shopped at farm stands, 29% at pick-your-own, 12% from tailgate markets and 17% from farmers markets. Nutrition was the reason 46% or respondents shopped at farm stands, 19% at pick-your-own, 11% from tailgate markets and 14% from farmers markets. Value for money was the reason 39% or respondents shopped at farm stands, 28% at pick-your-own, 7% from tailgate markets and 13% from farmers markets. Appearance of products was the reason 39% or respondents shopped at farm stands, 14% at pick-your-own, 7% from tailgate markets and 11% from farmers markets.

back to publication #1160

Chart 15: Is a stacked bar chart showing rural and urban reasons for NOT shopping at outlets. Limited hours was the reason 8 rural and 15 urban did not shop at farm stands; 7 rural and 28 urban did not shop at farmers markets; 2 rural and 1 urban did not shop at grocery stores. Raise my own garden produce was the reason 14 rural and 10 urban did not shop at farm stands; 11 rural and 8 urban did not shop at farmers markets; 8 rural and 9 urban did not shop at grocery stores. High prices was the reason 11 rural and 9 urban did not shop at farm stands; 4 rural and 19 urban did not shop at farmers markets; 26 rural and 26 urban did not shop at grocery stores. Poor quality was the reason 3 rural and 1 urban did not shop at farm stands; 0 rural and 1 urban did not shop at farmers markets; 20 rural and 28 urban did not shop at grocery stores. Limited variety was the reason 10 rural and 11 urban did not shop at farm stands; 3 rural and 7 urban did not shop at farmers markets; 14 rural and 8 urban did not shop at grocery stores. Don’t know any in my area was the reason 4 rural and 15 urban did not shop at farm stands; 12 rural and 3 urban did not shop at farmers markets; 1 rural and 0 urban did not shop at grocery stores. Inconvenient location was the reason 7 rural and 12 urban did not shop at farm stands; 9 rural and 9 urban did not shop at farmers markets; 1 rural and 1 urban did not shop at grocery stores. Too far was the reason 4 rural and 9 urban did not shop at farm stands; 6 rural and 4 urban did not shop at farmers markets; 0 rural and 1 urban did not shop at grocery stores. Don’t accept food stamps was the reason 5 rural and 3 urban did not shop at farm stands; 2 rural and 2 urban did not shop at farmers markets; 0 rural and 0 urban did not shop at grocery stores.

back to publication #1160

Chart 16: A stacked bar chart showing perceived problems with farm direct products. The percent of respondents who identified problems with appearance of fruit was 6%, vegetables was 7%, livestock products was 2% and other farm products was 2%. The percent of respondents who identified problems with poor flavor of fruit was 5%, vegetables was 10%, livestock products was 2% and other farm products was 1%.

The percent of respondents who identified problems with tough fruit was 2%, vegetables was 7%, livestock products was 4% and other farm products was 0%.

The percent of respondents who identified problems with bruised fruit was 10%, vegetables was 6%, livestock products was 1% and other farm products was 1%.

The percent of respondents who identified problems with not fresh fruit was 5%, vegetables was 8%, livestock products was 2% and other farm products was 1%.

The percent of respondents who identified other problems with fruit was 3%, vegetables was 7%, livestock products was 1% and other farm products was 1%.

back to publication #1160

Chart 17: A bar chart showing the willingness to buy and pay more for management methods. 48% of respondents would likely purchase products raised with organic methods and 38% would be willing to pay more for these products. 40% of respondents would likely purchase products raised with hormone free methods and 31% would be willing to pay more for these products. 30% of respondents would likely purchase products raised on range methods and 24% would be willing to pay more for these products. 33% of respondents would likely purchase products raised with GMO free methods and 27% would be willing to pay more for these products.

back to publication #1160

Chart 18: A bar chart showing the importance of origin label to purchasing decision. The respondents indicated that 44% found the labels very useful, 35% found them somewhat useful, 6% did not find them useful and 11% did not use the labels.

back to publication #1160

Table 2: Time Preferred for shopping. Note that some respondents indicated more than one preferred time. Weekdays were preferred by 22% rural and 18% urban respondents.

Weekends were preferred by 27% rural and 18% urban respondents. No preferred day was indicated by 56% rural and 62% urban respondents. Mornings were preferred by 33% rural and 34% urban respondents. Afternoons were preferred by 31% rural and 36% urban respondents. Evenings were preferred by 18% rural and 25% urban respondents. No preferred time of day was indicated by 42% rural and 28% urban respondents.

back to publication #1160


Back to Bulletin #1160, Why Consumers Buy — and Don’t Buy — Your Farm Direct Products