Posts Tagged ‘4-H Community Central’

Community Central Summer of Science

Tuesday, September 5th, 2017

This summer, teen leaders from Lewiston and Portland taught youth across the two cities using the Summer of Science curriculum developed by UMaine Extension and Maine EPSCoR.

CYFAR Teen Hanan at Summer Success Picnic

The summer began with youth enjoying time at Bryant Pond 4-H Camp for a two-day training. Time at Bryant Pond included learning the activities, team building exercises with camp staff, and using Click2Science to review facilitation skills.

SOS Topsham Fair

Youth across Portland and Lewiston participated in 6 activities weeks of activities that focused on the Engineering Process.

SOS BGCA Auburn

July 14 2017 169

This material is based upon the work of 4-H Community Central Maine, a project supported by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, United States (U.S.) Department of Agriculture, through a cooperative agreement with The University of Maine under award number 2014-41520-22235
General information about the CYFAR grant program can be accessed online at:
https://nifa.usda.gov/program/children-youth-and-families-risk-cyfar

For further information about the CYFAR-funded project highlighted in this publication, contact:
CYFAR Project Name: 4-H Community Central Maine
Principal Investigator: Kristy L  Ouellette
Email Address: kristy.ouellette@maine.edu
Website: https://extension.umaine.edu/4h/tag/4-h-community-central/

Making It Rain – Inside?

Friday, March 24th, 2017

Community Central youth have begun looking at climate and weather.
Can you make it rain, inside? Yes! Sort of.

Using a few easily found/recycled materials youth found that when several forces work together a storm occurs: humidity, temperature, wind, and high/low-pressure systems. Several of these activities use supplies that you might have at home! Information about this and other climate activities can be found on the Cornell Cooperative Extension website.

Graph showing weather patterns

Using M&Ms youth at the Boys & Girls Club demonstrated how each year there were different amounts of weather types that contributed to the overall climate of Maine.

How does climate differ from weather? Climate describes long-term trends, weather describes short-term trends.  Both Maine and Florida have days with colder or hotter weather, but Maine gets quite a bit colder during winter. Both areas have rainy days, but it is much more likely that a hurricane will occur near Florida than in Maine.

Young man and volunteer working on drawing a topographical map.

A volunteer at the Root Cellar – Lewiston looks on as a Community Central participant measures snowfall and begins creating a topographical map.

 

This material is based upon the work of 4-H Community Central Maine, a project supported by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, United States (U.S.) Department of Agriculture, through a cooperative agreement with The University of Maine under award number 2014-41520-22235
General information about the CYFAR grant program can be accessed online at:
https://nifa.usda.gov/program/children-youth-and-families-risk-cyfar

For further information about the CYFAR-funded project highlighted in this publication, contact:
CYFAR Project Name: 4-H Community Central Maine
Principal Investigator: Kristy L  Ouellette
Email Address: kristy.ouellette@maine.edu
Website: https://extension.umaine.edu/4h/tag/4-h-community-central/

Exploring with Community Central

Friday, March 10th, 2017

Community Central participants at Front Street in Portland have had a busy few weeks exploring density, polymers, and looking at iron content in breakfast cereal!

test tube with fluids of different densitiesCheck out this 4-H activity you can do with items you probably already have at home!

In Lewiston, 4th graders finished their exploration of different forms of energy by looking at chemical reactions that produce heat as a by-product and how to build a static electricity detector.

4-H youth building static electricity detector.

two fourth graders seeing static electricity at work

We’re excited to see you next year in 5th grade!

This material is based upon the work of 4-H Community Central Maine, a project supported by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, United States (U.S.) Department of Agriculture, through a cooperative agreement with The University of Maine under award number 2014-41520-22235
General information about the CYFAR grant program can be accessed online at:
https://nifa.usda.gov/program/children-youth-and-families-risk-cyfar

For further information about the CYFAR-funded project highlighted in this publication, contact:
CYFAR Project Name: 4-H Community Central Maine
Principal Investigator: Kristy L  Ouellette
Email Address: kristy.ouellette@maine.edu
Website: https://extension.umaine.edu/4h/tag/4-h-community-central/

An Energetic Start to 2017

Friday, February 3rd, 2017

Community Central began 2017 by looking at different forms of energy with 4th-graders at McMahon Elementary. Many of these students participated with Community Central as 3rd-graders and some have attended sessions at community partner locations across Lewiston.

To explore potential and kinetic energy youth built tracks for marbles using pipe insulation. The first challenge was to see if they could create a jump that would launch their marble into a cup.

Kinetic-Potential1

After creating a successful ski jump, some were able to create a loop-de-loop track! We’re looking forward to more energy exploration over the next few weeks with these young scientists.

This material is based upon the work of 4-H Community Central Maine, a project supported by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, United States (U.S.) Department of Agriculture, through a cooperative agreement with The University of Maine under award number 2014-41520-22235
General information about the CYFAR grant program can be accessed online at:
https://nifa.usda.gov/program/children-youth-and-families-risk-cyfar

For further information about the CYFAR-funded project highlighted in this publication, contact:
CYFAR Project Name: 4-H Community Central Maine
Principal Investigator: Kristy L  Ouellette
Email Address: kristy.ouellette@maine.edu
Website: https://extension.umaine.edu/4h/tag/4-h-community-central/

3… 2… 1… Blastoff!

Tuesday, January 3rd, 2017

Community Central Lewiston’s 2016 sessions ended with a bang and we’re ready for the new year!

Over the past couple months youth at the Root Cellar, the Boys and Girls Club Auburn/Lewiston Clubhouse, and Lewiston Housing Authority have been exploring rockets.

Youth began by experimenting with film canister explosions, mixing different amounts of Alka Seltzer and warm water with food coloring. Results of Alka Seltzer explosions

From there, the youth began learning the parts of rockets, designing their own rockets with film canisters, and preparing for the first launches.

Film Canister Launching

We’ve blasted into the new year and we’re excited to visit McMahon Elementary 4th grade classrooms exploring energy and start looking at emergency preparedness with our community sites.

It’s going to be a very exciting year for Community Central and we look forward to sharing our journey with you.

This material is based upon the work of 4-H Community Central Maine, a project supported by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, United States (U.S.) Department of Agriculture, through a cooperative agreement with The University of Maine under award number 2014-41520-22235
General information about the CYFAR grant program can be accessed online at:
https://nifa.usda.gov/program/children-youth-and-families-risk-cyfar

For further information about the CYFAR-funded project highlighted in this publication, contact:
CYFAR Project Name: 4-H Community Central Maine
Principal Investigator: Kristy L  Ouellette
Email Address: kristy.ouellette@maine.edu
Website: https://extension.umaine.edu/4h/tag/4-h-community-central/

Exploring Density with Community Central

Tuesday, November 22nd, 2016

Youth across Lewiston have been exploring the density of fluids, including experimenting to see how many fluids they could stack on top of one another.

test tube with layers of fluids

Can you guess which fluids are here?

At the Root Cellar, Lewiston Housing Authority, and the Boys and Girls Club, the youth had five fluids to stack on top of one another. In the test tube above the stacks included: dark corn syrup (brown), dish soap (green), water (blue), vegetable oil (clear), and rubbing alcohol (red).

In past weeks youth had explored hydrophilic and hydrophobic natures of various fluids and why oil and water won’t mix together. What do you think happened when we shook our test tubes? What happened to our neatly stacked layers?

Maisy holding cup with fluids stacked by density

A peek behind the scenes: Maisy, Community Education Assistant, preparing for sessions on exploring fluid density.

Each week, Community Central staff prepare sessions tailored to classroom science themes and youth interest. We’re having fun preparing for the end of our current theme, stay tuned!

This material is based upon the work of 4-H Community Central Maine, a project supported by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, United States (U.S.) Department of Agriculture, through a cooperative agreement with The University of Maine under award number 2014-41520-22235
General information about the CYFAR grant program can be accessed online at:
https://nifa.usda.gov/program/children-youth-and-families-risk-cyfar

For further information about the CYFAR-funded project highlighted in this publication, contact:
CYFAR Project Name: 4-H Community Central Maine
Principal Investigator: Kristy L  Ouellette
Email Address: kristy.ouellette@maine.edu
Website: https://extension.umaine.edu/4h/tag/4-h-community-central/

Community Central has gone batty!

Tuesday, November 15th, 2016

Over the past few weeks, Community Central has been working with 3rd-grade students at McMahon Elementary School to learn all about bats!

Bat Mural

Bat Habitat Mural 1

While learning about bat habitats, students each colored a page of a mural without knowing what the full photo looked like! Each habitat needs four things: water, food, shelter and space.

Bat Habitat Mural 2

Can you identify the four parts of the habitat in the mural above?

Students have been learning about White Nose Syndrome and the impact it is having on  bat populations, especially in New England. Scientists are studying rates of White Nose Syndrome and working to protect bat populations. Bats are essential to insect control and plant pollination.

Students wrote essays about what they have learned and why we need to be careful to not let bats go extinct.

Students wrote essays about what they have learned and why we need to be careful to not let bats go extinct.

This material is based upon the work of 4-H Community Central Maine, a project supported by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, United States (U.S.) Department of Agriculture, through a cooperative agreement with The University of Maine under award number 2014-41520-22235
General information about the CYFAR grant program can be accessed online at:
https://nifa.usda.gov/program/children-youth-and-families-risk-cyfar

For further information about the CYFAR-funded project highlighted in this publication, contact:
CYFAR Project Name: 4-H Community Central Maine
Principal Investigator: Kristy L  Ouellette
Email Address: kristy.ouellette@maine.edu
Website: https://extension.umaine.edu/4h/tag/4-h-community-central/

Let’s Talk Physics… and Star Wars!

Friday, October 21st, 2016

Community Central Lewiston has officially kicked off the new 4-H year!

Yesterday, students at McMahon Elementary enjoyed the Mainly Physics Roadshow. The roadshow, hosted by David Sturm of the University of Maine Orono Department of Physics and Astronomy, demonstrates concepts of physics in a fun, interactive way.

David Sturm, demonstrating how a laser is visible through a plastic cylinder. Looks a lot like Yoda's lightsaber!

David Sturm, demonstrating how a laser is visible through a plastic cylinder — looks a lot like Yoda’s lightsaber!

Later, over 100 students and their families joined us for dinner and a show with more demonstrations and opportunities to see how physics is part of our everyday lives.

IMG_8039

Thank you to the faculty and staff at McMahon for hosting the event and to David Sturm for sharing the Mainly Physics Roadshow with us!

For more information about Community Central, please contact Kristy L Ouellette, PI of the Maine 4-H Community Central Program at kristy.ouellette@maine.edu.
Community Central is a project funded by the USDA’s Children, Youth, and Families at Risk (CYFAR) Sustainable Community Projects program.

Community Central – Farewell to Summer

Friday, September 2nd, 2016

It’s that time of year again! We’re back to school and after-school programming. We hope that all of our youth members, teen leaders, and community partners have a smooth start to the school year. We are excited to begin our after-school programming in a couple weeks and to begin visiting McMahon Elementary in October.

We want to extend a big thank you to all of our youth and teen members for a fun filled summer. Another big thank you to our community partners that hosted Community Central programming. Our partnerships are critical to our continuing success and we want to thank the faculty, staff, and youth at all of our community partners for supporting and hosting us this summer: Lewiston Housing Authority, McMahon Elementary, Lewiston 21st Century program, Boys and Girl’s Club Auburn/Lewiston Clubhouse, The Root Cellar – Lewiston, and Tree Street Youth.

In Teen Leader news, Laura and Maisy joined three of our Teen Leaders at Physic’s Day at Funtown/Splashtown, an event held by the Cooperative Extension 4-H in Cumberland County. The event, held as a celebration for our teens, included a physics worksheet with problems to solve based on the rides at the park.

 

CC Lew Funtown

Congratulations to the Lewiston Community Central Teen Leaders for taking first place!

Community Central at the Boys and Girls Club

Thursday, July 28th, 2016

Community Central is excited to be working with the Boys and Girls Club Auburn/Lewiston Clubhouse this summer!

At the clubhouse, youth are exploring aquaculture and seaweed with the 4-H Summer of Science kit. During a recent session youth took out microscopes and their science journals to help each other identify rehydrated seaweed samples.

Youth writing in science journals.

Nia, a member of the Boys and Girls Club since elementary school, has joined our teen leader team! “This year I was offered an opportunity to be a Teen Leader with The 4-H Community Central Program. I really enjoy working with the kids in my community because the science topics are interesting. I also like all the games and experiments we do. It is fun to learn new things and share them with the kids.”

IMG_0079

Welcome, Nia!

“Being a Teen Leader for the 4-H program is really rewarding and is a great experience. I would love to do it again next year. I recommend this program and the Boys and Girls Club to anyone who enjoys learning new things and helping their community. It is a great feeling to know there are kids who also enjoy these programs and look up to you as a Teen Leader. This has been an experience I will remember forever!”

The Summer of Science project is supported by a National Science Foundation award to Maine EPSCoR at the University of Maine.
For more information about Community Central, please contact Kristy L Ouellette, PI of the Maine 4-H Community Central Program at kristy.ouellette@maine.edu.
Community Central is a project funded by the USDA’s Children, Youth, and Families at Risk (CYFAR) Sustainable Community Projects program.