Maine Vegetable and Fruit School 2018

January 9th, 2018 3:28 PM

University of Maine Cooperative Extension Highmoor FarmMaine Vegetable and Fruit School 2018

The day-long school is offered for Maine farmers on two dates at two locations: March 13 in Portland or March 14 in Bangor. Preregistration is required.

EARLY BIRD REGISTRATION:  Cost for registration is $45.00 per person if received by February 26th, or $55 if received after February 26th, and includes lunch. Please register by March 2, 2018.

Register online here or click on the link below for our registration form to mail in with payment. Please contact Pam St. Peter with any registration inquiries at 207.933.2100 or pamela.stpeter@maine.edu.

Print a registration form (PDF)

Maine Vegetable and Fruit School is hosted by

  • University of Maine Cooperative Extension
  • Maine Vegetable & Small Fruit Growers Association

Tuesday, March 13, 2018
SEASONS EVENT AND CONFERENCE CENTER
155 Riverside Street, Portland, Maine 04103
Tel. 207.775.6536

Wednesday, March 14, 2018
BANGOR MOTOR INN CONFERENCE CENTER

701 Hogan Road, Bangor, Maine 04401
Tel. 207.947.0355 or 1.800.244.0355

AGENDA – March 13, 2018 in Portland and March 14, 2018 in Bangor

8:30 AM REGISTRATION
9:00 AM Legislative Update
— Senator James Dill
9:15 AM Multi-Species Cover Crops Can Benefit Your Vegetables
— Jason Lilley
9:45 AM Plant Disease Diagnostic Lab: How to Get the Most from Your Samples
— Dr. Alicyn Smart
10:15 AM BREAK
10:30 AM Brown Tail Moth – What to Expect, Management Strategies
— Dr. Eleanor Groden
11:00 AM Maximizing Farm Operations with Value-Added Products
— Ronda Stone
11:45 AM LUNCH
12:30 PM Root Diseases – and Root Dips as a Management Tool
— Dr. Eleanor Groden
1:00 PM Permanent Beds: Soil Health and Weed Management
— Jeremiah Vallotton
1:30 PM Integrated Pest Management for High Tunnels
— Dr. Mark Hutton
2:00 PM Circle B Farms: Berries in Caribou
— Sam Blackstone
2:15 PM BREAK
2:30 PM Risk Management: Updates for Diversified Growers
— Erin Roche
3:00 PM Simple Ways to Improve Your Record Keeping
— Tori Jackson
3:30 PM Paper Mulch Trials at Highmoor Farm
— Dr. Mark Hutton
4:00 PM WRAP-UP & EVALUATION

Speakers

Sam Blackstone – Circle B Farms, Caribou
Hon. Dr. James Dill – Maine State Senator and Pest Management Specialist, UMaine Cooperative Extension
Dr. Eleanor Groden
– Professor of Entomology, UMaine School of Biology and Ecology
Dr. Mark Hutton – Vegetable Specialist and Associate Professor of Vegetable Crops, UMaine Cooperative Extension
Tori Lee Jackson – Extension Educator and Associate Professor of Agriculture and Natural Resources, UMaine Cooperative Extension
Jason Lilley – Sustainable Agriculture Professional, UMaine Cooperative Extension
Erin Roche – Crop Insurance Education Program Manager, UMaine Cooperative Extension
Dr. Alicyn Smart – Assistant Extension Professor and Plant Pathologist, UMaine Cooperative Extension
Ronda Stone – Consumer Protection Inspector, Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry
Jeremiah Vallotton – Graduate Student, University of Maine

Thank you to our sponsors, Northeast Agricultural Sales and Nourse Farms.


Participants may receive 3 Pesticide Applicator recertification credits and Certified Crop Advisors may earn 5 recertification credits for participating the entire day.


For more information about this or other workshops, please contact:

Mark Hutchinson, Extension Professor
University of Maine Cooperative Extension
Knox-Lincoln Counties
377 Manktown Road
Waldoboro, ME 04572
Tel. 207.832.0343 or 1.800.244.2104 (in Maine).
mhutch@maine.edu


Any person with a disability who needs accommodations for this program should contact Mark Hutchinson at 1.800.244.2104 to discuss any needed arrangements. Receiving requests for accommodations at least 10 days before the program provides a reasonable amount of time to meet the request; however, all requests will be considered.

Spotted Wing Drosophila Alert: October 20, 2017

October 23rd, 2017 10:17 AM
Spotted Wing Drosophila Trap Catch

Spotted Wing Drosophila Trap Catch, photo by Christina Hillier

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA ALERT:  OCTOBER 20, 2017

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

Trap counts of spotted wing drosophila rose dramatically in some locations over the past week. We are now finding fly numbers in the thousands at more than half of our trapping sites. (See table below.) All sites remain well over the threshold for larvae infestation if susceptible crops are not protected with regular sprays or netting. A spray interval of every 5 to 7 days should be adequate to prevent any marketable fruit remaining in the field from becoming infested. Continue harvest regularly and often, and keep overripe and rotten fruit out of the field as much as possible. Long range weather forecasts suggest continued warmer than normal temperatures ahead, which will both extend the late berry season and likely keep spotted wing drosophila pressure high.

Spotted Wing Drosophila Larvae in Raspberry

Spotted Wing Drosophila Larvae in Raspberry, photo by David Handley

For more information on identifying spotted wing drosophila and updates on populations around the state, visit our SWD blog.

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                      Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Town Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 10/6/17 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 10/13/17 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 10/20/17
Wells 567 88 8664
Limington 87 152 3488
Limerick 1808 187 637
Cape Elizabeth 124 750 2424
New Gloucester 209 408 1272
Bowdoinham 563 244 1584
Dresden 4376 2816 3368
Freeport 133 655 407
Poland Spring 440 294 3504
Mechanic Falls 55 31 546
Monmouth 4696 1188 3368
Wales 343 372 325
Farmington 7568 5680 5112

 

 

Spotted Wing Drosophila Alert: October 13, 2017

October 13th, 2017 2:03 PM
Spotted Wing Drosophila Damage in Elderberry Plant

Spotted Wing Drosophila Damage in Elderberry Plant, photo by David Handley

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA ALERT:  10/13/2017

Click on photos to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

Spotted wing drosophila populations continue to be high but variable this week. While some locations saw decreases in the weekly trap catch, others had the highest numbers of the season. (See table below.) This variability can be due to a number of factors, including changing availability of food, ambient moisture, temperature, and insecticide applications. Despite the variation however, all sites were over the threshold for infestation if fruit were left untreated; and growers who still have ripening fruit should continue to protect their crop on a spray interval of 5 to 7 days to prevent fruit from becoming infested. Also, continue harvest regularly and often, and keep overripe and rotten fruit out of the field as much as possible. Long range weather forecasts suggest a warmer than normal stretch of days ahead. While this is great for extending the late berry season, it also means that spotted wing drosophila will likely continue to be a threat.

Male and Female Spotted Wing Drosophila Flies

Male (left) and Female (right) Spotted Wing Drosophila, photo by Griffin Dill. Actual size: 2-3 mm.

For more information on identifying spotted wing drosophila and updates on populations around the state, visit our SWD blog.

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                      Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Town Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/29/17 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 10/6/17 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 10/13/17
Wells 527 567 88
Limington 373 80 152
Limerick 174 799 187
Cape Elizabeth 879 204 750
New Gloucester 341 259 408
Bowdoinham 264 746 244
Dresden 554 2064 2816
Freeport 359 111 655
Poland Spring 1866 2608 294
Mechanic Falls 113 51 31
Monmouth 63 1624 1188
Wales 104 450 372
Farmington 286 440 5680

Spotted Wing Drosophila Alert: October 10, 2017

October 10th, 2017 3:02 PM
Spotted Wing Drosophila Larvae in Elderberries

Spotted Wing Drosophila Larvae in Elderberries, photo by David Handley

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA ALERT:  OCTOBER 10, 2017

Click on photos to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

Spotted wing drosophila numbers increased significantly at some of the trapping sites this week, although there doesn’t seem to be a pattern to those increases geographically. (See table below.) Fly numbers at other locations remained relatively stable or had slight decreases. However, all sites are still well over the threshold for infestation if fruit are left untreated. We have had several calls over the past two weeks regarding late ripening fruit (strawberries and elderberries) being infested with larvae. Therefore, growers who still have ripening fruit should continue to protect their crop on a spray interval of 5 to 7 days to prevent fruit from becoming infested It is also important to keep wounded and rotten fruit out of the field as much as possible. Allowing it to stay on the plant or on the ground will attract more flies and provide food and shelter for more eggs and larvae. With the long-term forecasts predicting continued warmer than normal temperatures, it is likely that spotted wing drosophila will continue to threaten late ripening berries.

Insects in Spotted Wing Drosophila Trap

Insects in Spotted Wing Drosophila Trap, Male SWD Circled, photo by Kaytlin Woodman

For more information on identifying spotted wing drosophila and updates on populations around the state, visit our SWD blog.

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                      Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Town Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/22/17 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/29/17 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 10/6/17
Wells 45 527 567
Limington 373 80 87
Limerick 174 799 1808
Cape Elizabeth 879 204 124
New Gloucester 341 259 209
Bowdoinham 264 746 563
Dresden 554 2064 4376
Freeport 359 111 133
Poland Spring 1866 2608 440
Mechanic Falls 113 51 55
Monmouth 63 1624 4696
Wales 104 450 343
Farmington 286 440 7568

Spotted Wing Drosophila Alert: September 22, 2017

October 6th, 2017 10:47 AM
Spotted Wing Drosophila

Spotted Wing Drosophila, photo by Griffin Dill

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA ALERT: SEPTEMBER 22, 2017

Click on photos to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

There was a downturn in spotted wing drosophila numbers at most of our trapping locations this week, although it is important to note that all locations still had populations high enough to cause significant damage to any ripening fruit remaining in fields. (See table below.) Fall raspberries and day-neutral strawberries are especially susceptible at this time. Growers with any ripening fruit should continue protecting their crop against egg-laying drosophila. A minimum spray interval of 5 to 7 days is recommended to keep fruit from becoming infested.

For more information on identifying spotted wing drosophila and updates on populations around the state, visit our SWD blog.

Spotted Wing Drosophila Maggot in Raspberry

SWD Maggot in Raspberry, photo by David Handley

Quick Farm Labor Survey: This may be the easiest survey you have ever been asked to complete! It’s 10 questions that can be answered with a simple click of a button. We have heard your requests to provide educational resources to help you recruit, retain, and manage labor on your farms and at your agricultural businesses. We are looking to get information to help us focus on what resources would be especially helpful. Just 3 minutes of your time would make a big difference to us.

Please respond ASAP and before Sunday, October 8, 2017. To complete this survey please click here. Thanks again, for your time!

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                      Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Town Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/8/17 Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/15/17 Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/22/17
Wells 273 330 45
Limington 568 734 373
Limerick 326 1771 174
Cape Elizabeth 2968 1308 879
New Gloucester 272 383 341
Bowdoinham 449 792 264
Dresden 666 1584 554
Freeport 164 132 359
Poland Spring 807 1145 1866
Mechanic Falls 77 48 113
Monmouth 434 470 63
Wales 122 86 104
Farmington 1728 1848 286

Spotted Wing Drosophila Alert: September 29, 2017

October 2nd, 2017 9:18 AM
Male Spotted Wing Drosophila

Male Spotted Wing Drosophila, photo by Griffin Dill. Actual size: 2-3 mm.

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA ALERT: SEPTEMBER 29, 2017

Click on photos to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

Spotted wing drosophila numbers were variable from site to site this week, with some locations seeing little change or a slight decrease from last week, while others showed a significant increase. This may be due to the availability of fruit at each site, as the season starts to wind down, spraying at a site, or trap exposure during the recent hot, sunny days. It is important to note, however, that all locations still have drosophila numbers high enough to cause significant damage to any ripening fruit remaining in the fields. (See table below.) Fall raspberries and day-neutral strawberries are very susceptible at this time. We have also had reports of peaches being infested over the past week. Typically, thicker-skinned fruit like peaches, plums and grapes are not very susceptible to spotted wing drosophila unless the skin is cracked or wounded, which provides the flies with easy access to the flesh for egg laying. It is important to keep wounded and rotten fruit out of the field as much as possible. Allowing it to stay on the plant or on the ground will attract more flies and provide food and shelter for more eggs and larvae.

SWD Maggot in Raspberry

SWD Maggot in Raspberry, photo by David Handley

Growers with any ripening fruit should continue protecting their crop against egg-laying drosophila. A minimum spray interval of 5 to 7 days is recommended to keep fruit from becoming infested.

For more information on identifying spotted wing drosophila and updates on populations around the state, visit our SWD blog.

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                      Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Town Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/15/17 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/22/17 Spotted Wing Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/29/17
Wells 330 45 527
Limington 734 373 80
Limerick 1771 174 799
Cape Elizabeth 1308 879 204
New Gloucester 383 341 259
Bowdoinham 792 264 746
Dresden 1584 554 2064
Freeport 132 359 111
Poland Spring 1145 1866 2608
Mechanic Falls 48 113 51
Monmouth 470 63 1624
Wales 86 104 450
Farmington 1848 286 440

Spotted Wing Drosophila Alert: September 15, 2017

September 15th, 2017 3:15 PM

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA UPDATE: SEPTEMBER 15, 2017

Spotted Wing Drosophila Larvae in Raspberry

Spotted Wing Drosophila Larvae in Raspberry, photo by David Handley

Click on photos to enlarge.

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

Trap captures for spotted wing drosophila increased in most locations this week, likely stimulated by some warmer weather from tropical fronts moving through Maine. Fly populations remain well over the tolerance level to prevent fruit infestation. (See table below.) Growers with any susceptible ripening fruit will need to continue protecting their crop against larval infestation. Regular, consistent spray coverage is needed to prevent fruit infestation. At this time, we continue to recommend a minimum spray interval of 5 to 7 days.

There is a possibility that any more tropical storm fronts moving into the region could further increase drosophila numbers. Harvest all ripe fruit regularly and remove any rotten or cull fruit from the field.

Insects in Spotted Wing Drosophila Trap

Insects in Spotted Wing Drosophila Trap, Male SWD Circled, photo by Kaytlin Woodman

For more information on identifying spotted wing drosophila and updates on populations around the state, visit our SWD blog.

Other IPM Web Pages
Michigan State University
Penn State University
University of New Hampshire

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                      Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Town Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly trap catch 8/31/17 Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/8/17 Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/15/17
Wells 1256 273 330
Limington 428 568 734
Limerick 237 326 1771
Cape Elizabeth 2968 1308
New Gloucester 272 383
Bowdoinham 1448 449 792
Dresden 103 666 1584
Freeport 56 164
Poland Spring 597 807 1145
Mechanic Falls 65 77 48
Monmouth 681 434 470
Wales 642 122 86
Farmington 1552 1728 1848

Sweet Corn IPM Newsletter No. 13 – September 15, 2017

September 15th, 2017 1:20 PM

Sweet CornSweet Corn IPM Newsletter No. 13 – September 15, 2017
Click on photos to enlarge.

Last Issue for 2017!

INCREASING PEST PRESSURE TO END SEASON

Fresh Silking Corn Remaining Likely to Need Protection

This will be the final issue of the Sweet Corn IPM Newsletter for the 2017 season. I would like to thank all of the growers who participated in the program this year, and our team of IPM scouts, including Kara Rowley, Tammy Cushman, Lindsey Ridlon and Sean McAuley. Have questions, comments or suggestions about the program? Please call or e-mail us.

SITUATION
It appears the tropical fronts and warmer weather pushing through Maine have only brought about a moderate increase in moth activity. There may be more activity associated with tropical storms in the coming weeks, however, so the threat to any fresh silking corn that still remains may increase.

European corn borer:  No moth captures for a second week, so no real threat from European corn borer to end the season. There was no fresh larval feeding injury on younger corn and no sprays for this insect were recommended.

Corn Earworm Moth

Corn Earworm Moth, photo by David Handley

Fall Armyworm Moths

Fall Armyworm Moths (female right, male left), photo by James Dill

Corn earworm:  Moth counts rose moderately in most locations this week, keeping most fields with any fresh silk remaining on a spray schedule. A 6-day spray interval was recommended for silking corn in Oxford and one Wells site this week. A 5-day spray schedule was recommended in Auburn, one Dayton site and Sabattus. A 4-day spray interval was recommended in Cape Elizabeth, one Dayton location, North Berwick, and one Wells site.

Fall armyworm:  Moth activity was spotty around the state this week, with some sites seeing a slight increase in activity and others not. No sprays were recommended exclusively for fall armyworm on silking corn, because all sites over the 3-moth threshold were on a spray interval for corn earworm, including Cape Elizabeth, Dayton, Oxford and Sabattus. No sites were over the 15% injury threshold for larval feeding damage.

Just a reminder that fall is a great time for soil testing
Late summer and early fall are good times to seed cover crops to prevent soil erosion and to retain soil nutrients. It is also a great time to check on the health of your soil. Getting your soil test results before the ground freezes allows time to correct soil pH with additions of lime, and incorporate any needed supplements into the soil, such as phosphorus, potassium, magnesium or other nutrients to correct deficiencies, and/or manure to increase organic matter. Fall applications of lime and some nutrients (not nitrogen, as it is prone to leaching) are often better, because the fields are drier than in the spring. It’s easier to move equipment around, and the nutrients will have time to be worked into the soil before the plants need them. You can pick up soil test boxes and forms at any county office of the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, or call us here at Highmoor Farm if you’d like us to send you some. For details on soil testing at the University of Maine Analytical Laboratory and Soil Testing Service, you can visit their website at: https://umaine.edu/soiltestinglab/.

The New England Vegetable and Fruit Conference will be held in Manchester, New Hampshire on December 12, 13 and 14, 2017. Program and registration information will be coming soon. Visit the website, http://www.newenglandvfc.org/.

Sincerely,

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                      Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME  04259         Orono, ME  04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

Sweet Corn IPM Weekly Scouting Summary

Location CEW
Moths
ECB
Moths
FAW
Moths
%Feeding
Damage
Recommendations / Comments
Auburn 5 0 0 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Bowdoinham 1 0 0 0% No spray recommended
Cape Elizabeth I 26 0 17 4-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Cape Elizabeth II 16 0 13 0% 4-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Dayton I 63 0 13 0% 4-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Dayton II 6 0 4 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Monmouth 1 0 1 0% No spray recommended
North Berwick 11 0 2 4-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Oxford 3 0 9 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Sabattus 5 0 4 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Wales 1 0 1 0% No spray recommended
Wayne 0 0 0 No spray recommended
Wells I 2 0 2 6-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Wells II 10 0 0 4-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn

CEW: Corn earworm (Only fresh silking corn should be sprayed for this insect.)
ECB: European corn borer
FAW: Fall armyworm

Corn Earworm Spray Thresholds for Pheromone Traps

Moths caught per week Moths caught per night Spray interval
0.0 to 1.4 0.0 to 0.2 No spray
1.5 to 3.5 0.3 to 0.5 Spray every 6 days
3.6 to 7.0 0.6 to 1.0 Spray every 5 days
7.1 to 91 1.1 to 13.0 Spray every 4 days
More than 91 More than 13 Spray every 3 days

Thresholds apply only to corn with exposed fresh silk. Lengthen spray intervals by one day if maximum daily temperature is less than 80°F.

European Corn Borer Thresholds
Whorl stage: 30% or more of plants scouted show injury.
Pre-tassel-silk: 15% or more of plants scouted show injury.
Silk: 5 or more moths caught in pheromone traps in one week.

IPM Web Pages :
UMaine Cooperative Extension IPM
Penn State Sweet Corn IPM
UMass Extension IPM Programs

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Sweet Corn IPM Newsletter No. 12 – September 11, 2017

September 11th, 2017 3:06 PM

Sweet CornSweet Corn IPM Newsletter No. 12 – September 11, 2017
Click on photos to enlarge.

CORN PEST THREAT MODERATE BUT VARIABLE

Corn Earworm and Fall Armyworm Active in Silking Corn at Most Sites

SITUATION
Cool nights and some rainy days appear to be holding corn pests at moderate levels for this time of year, as the sweet corn season winds down. However, we may still have the remnants of tropical storms to deal with over the next couple of weeks which could cause an increase in corn earworm and/or fall armyworm populations. Next week will be the last scheduled issue of the Sweet Corn IPM Newsletter for the 2017 season.

European corn borer:  No moth captures this week, suggesting the threat of corn borer may be over for this season. Larval feeding injury on younger corn was also very low, and did not exceed threshold at any location.

Corn earworm:  Overall, moth counts remain fairly low this week, but high enough to keep some sites on a tight spray schedule for any fresh silking corn remaining. A 5-day spray schedule was recommended in Auburn, New Gloucester, North Berwick, and Wells.  A 4-day spray interval was recommended in Biddeford, Cape Elizabeth, one Dayton location, Lewiston, Monmouth and Sabattus.

Corn Earworm Feeding on Corn

Corn Earworm Feeding on Corn, photo by David Handley

Fall Army Worm on Pre-tassel Corn Plant

Fall Army Worm on Pre-tassel Corn, photo by David Handley

Fall armyworm:  Moth activity is becoming spottier from site to site, with some locations well over the 3-moth threshold for silking corn, and others seeing few, if any moths. A spray for fall armyworm on silking corn was recommended in one Dayton site, Nobleboro, Poland Spring and Wales. Other sites, including Auburn, Biddeford, Cape Elizabeth, Dayton, Lewiston, Monmouth, North Berwick, and Sabattus were also over the 3-moth threshold, but are on a spray schedule for corn earworm. No sites were over the 15% injury threshold for larval feeding damage in pre-tassel to tassel corn.

Annual end of corn season checklist:

  1. Plow down corn stalks and stubble to destroy overwintering larvae of European corn borer.
  2. Plant a cover crop, such as winter rye, to prevent soil erosion and to add organic matter to the soil.
  3. Take a soil test to determine if lime or other nutrients should be applied.
  4. Plan to rotate your crops to prevent pests from building up in any one location.
  5. Evaluate your weed management results. What worked well and what didn’t?  Which weeds were the biggest problems?  How can you improve control?

Unplowed Corn Field

Unplowed Corn Field, photo by David Handley

Oats Cover Crop

Oats Cover Crop, photo by David Handley

The New England Vegetable & Fruit Conference will be held in Manchester, NH on December 12, 13, and 14, 2017. Program and registration information will be coming soon. Visit the website: http://www.newenglandvfc.org/.

Reminder: Free disposal of unusable pesticides
The Maine Board of Pesticides Control (BPC) and the Maine Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) are sponsoring the Obsolete Pesticides Collection Program. This free program is open to homeowners, family-owned farms and greenhouses. Collections of unwanted pesticides will occur at four sites: Presque Isle, Bangor, Augusta, and Portland. Participants must pre-register by September 29, 2017Drop-ins are not permitted. To register, get details, and learn important information about the temporary storage and transportation of obsolete pesticides, go to the Maine BPC web site or call 207.287.2731.

Sincerely,

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                      Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME  04259         Orono, ME  04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

Sweet Corn IPM Weekly Scouting Summary

Location CEW
Moths
ECB
Moths
FAW
Moths
%Feeding
Damage
Recommendations / Comments
Auburn 5 0 10 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Biddeford 8 0 7 4-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Bowdoinham 0 0 0 No spray recommended
Cape Elizabeth I 25 0 38 4-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Cape Elizabeth II 8 0 17 4-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Dayton I 41 0 107 0% 4-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Dayton II 0 0 5 One spray for FAW on all silking corn
Lewiston 15 0 4 4-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Monmouth 12 0 9 4-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
New Gloucester 6 0 0 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Nobleboro 0 0 42 One spray for FAW on all silking corn
North Berwick 4 0 3 3% 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Oxford 1 0 2 No spray recommended
Poland Spring 0 0 12 One spray for FAW on all silking corn
Sabattus 14 0 7 4-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Wales 0 0 5 One spray for FAW on all silking corn
Wayne 0 0 0 No spray recommended
Wells I 5 0 2 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn
Wells II 4 0 2 9% 5-day spray interval recommended on all silking corn

CEW: Corn earworm (Only fresh silking corn should be sprayed for this insect.)
ECB: European corn borer
FAW: Fall armyworm

Corn Earworm Spray Thresholds for Pheromone Traps

Moths caught per week Moths caught per night Spray interval
0.0 to 1.4 0.0 to 0.2 No spray
1.5 to 3.5 0.3 to 0.5 Spray every 6 days
3.6 to 7.0 0.6 to 1.0 Spray every 5 days
7.1 to 91 1.1 to 13.0 Spray every 4 days
More than 91 More than 13 Spray every 3 days

Thresholds apply only to corn with exposed fresh silk. Lengthen spray intervals by one day if maximum daily temperature is less than 80°F.

European Corn Borer Thresholds
Whorl stage: 30% or more of plants scouted show injury.
Pre-tassel-silk: 15% or more of plants scouted show injury.
Silk: 5 or more moths caught in pheromone traps in one week.

IPM Web Pages:
UMaine Cooperative Extension IPM
Penn State Sweet Corn IPM
UMass Extension IPM Programs

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

 

 

Spotted Wing Drosophila Alert: September 11, 2017

September 11th, 2017 2:47 PM

SPOTTED WING DROSOPHILA ALERT: SEPTEMBER 11, 2017

Click on photo to enlarge.

Spotted Wing Drosophila Emerging from Fall Raspberries

SWD Emerging from Fall Raspberries, photo by James Dill

David Handley, Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist; James Dill, Pest Management Specialist; Frank Drummond, Professor of Insect Ecology/Entomology

Our trap captures for spotted wing drosophila did not change significantly in most locations last week, meaning that populations are generally well over the tolerance level to prevent infestation of any soft fruit remaining in the fields. (See table below.) Growers with any susceptible ripening fruit need to continue protecting their crop against larval infestation. Only regular, consistent spray coverage will prevent fruit infestation. At this time, we continue to recommend a minimum spray interval of 5 to 7 days.

We do not expect populations to start to decline until the flies are exposed to several hard frosts. There is a possibility that any tropical storm fronts moving into the region could actually cause a significant increase in drosophila numbers. Keep harvesting ripe fruit regularly and remove all rotten or cull fruit from the field.

For more information on identifying spotted wing drosophila and updates on populations around the state, visit our SWD blog.

Other IPM Web Pages
Michigan State University
Penn State University
University of New Hampshire

David T. Handley
Vegetable and Small Fruit Specialist

Highmoor Farm                      Pest Management Office
P.O. Box 179                             491 College Avenue
Monmouth, ME 04259          Orono, ME 04473
207.933.2100                           1.800.287.0279

Where brand names or company names are used it is for the reader’s information. No endorsement is implied nor is any discrimination intended against other products with similar ingredients. Always consult product labels for rates, application instructions and safety precautions. Users of these products assume all associated risks.

The University of Maine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Town Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly trap catch 8/23/17 Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly trap catch 8/31/17 Spotted Wing  Drosophila weekly trap catch 9/8/17
Wells 387 1256 273
Sanford 93 143
Limington 842 428 568
Limerick 217 237 326
Cape Elizabeth 4320 2968
New Gloucester 603 272
Bowdoinham 925 1448 449
Dresden 104 103 666
Freeport 40 56
Poland Spring 304 597 807
Mechanic Falls 16 65 77
Monmouth 415 681 434
Wales 1816 (2 weeks) 642 122
Farmington 1048 1552 1728