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UMaine Cooperative Extension: Insect Pests, Ticks and Plant Diseases


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Pesticide Safety Education Program

To become licensed to apply pesticides in Maine, individuals must first earn certification through examinations that show proficiency in pest management, pesticide use and safety. The Maine Pesticide Safety Education Program provides certification training for all agricultural basic, private, and commercial pesticide applicators in a collaborative effort between University of Maine Cooperative Extension, the Maine Board of Pesticides Control, the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, and the US Environmental Protection Agency.

For training manuals and upcoming recertification opportunities, please see:

For more information on certification & licensing, pesticide laws & regulations, and the Worker Protection Standard, contact the Maine Board of Pesticides Control at 207.287.2731.

 

Please direct questions regarding training manuals to:

Sean McAuley
University of Maine Cooperative Extension
Pest Management Office
491 College Ave.
Orono, ME 04473-1295
sean.mcauley@maine.edu
(207) 581.3855

Please direct questions regarding licensing, certification, pesticide laws & regulations, etc. to:

Megan Patterson
Manager of Pesticide Programs
Board of Pesticides Control
State House Station #28
Augusta, ME 04333-0028
Megan.L.Patterson@maine.gov
(207) 287.8804

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University of Maine Cooperative Extension


Contact Information

UMaine Cooperative Extension: Insect Pests, Ticks and Plant Diseases
491 College Avenue
Orono, Maine 04473-1295
Phone: 207.581.3880 or 800.287.0279 (in Maine)E-mail: extension@maine.edu
The University of Maine
Orono, Maine 04469
207.581.1110
A Member of the University of Maine System